Foreign Radio & Television

Jan 26th, 2007, in News, by

Foreign radio and television broadcasts should be censored, say some leaders.

Joko Susilo, a member of the Information Commission of the Indonesian parliament from the National Mandate Party (Partai Amanat Nasional (PAN)) from East Java, says that relayed foreign broadcasts, whether radio or television, such as Voice of America (VOA), have to be stopped immediately.

Joko Susilo
Joko Susilo.

Sofyan Djalil, the minister for Communications and Information, said he couldn't solve the "problem" because the Indonesian Broadcasting Commission (Komisi Penyiaran Indonesia (KPI)) was obstinate in not doing what the regulations required.

Sofyan Djalil
Sofyan Djalil.

Sofyan however vowed that in future the government would tackle the issue and make sure that foreign broadcasts were delayed, so that they could be censored. tempo


43 Comments on “Foreign Radio & Television”

  1. avatar Tomaculum says:

    PR of China and the Soviet union have done it.
    Including Al Jazeera?
    🙂

  2. avatar Colson says:

    Saving Indonesia by censorship? Protecting the population from disturbing facts or dissenting opinions? Nowadays only in dictatorships like China authorities or authoritarian regimes like Iran, give measures like these a try. And, shame, o shame, Google gave in to the demands of the Beying government. But fortunately it does not work out.

    So, please mr Sofyan Djalil, get real, wake up! It’s 2007. The world is flat again. Communication is the game. It’s a bad as well as a stupid idea. It can not work and it should not work.

  3. avatar Munafikbangetloepade says:

    Those who are behind this silly “idea” are wimps, wimps of the wimps.

  4. avatar Dimp says:

    Yes, we need to censor everything, and we also need to make people to be home at certain hours, we also need to register everyone and record their DNA, also ankle bracelet need to be attached to every single Indonesian so the government can trace every movement.

    I think the government should supervise all Indonesian, so maybe they need to send a government “supervisor” to every household in Indonesia…. another way to create work for the unemployed.

    And not TVs, radios, internets, newspapers, magazines, books unless it it broadcast, published by the Indonesian government.

    Also we need to change the capital to Pyongyang.

  5. avatar Peter says:

    Are things like this proposed all the time, but never instituted in Indonesia? Or is this a new trend (i.e. pornoaksi, etc.)?

    Stuff like this makes me worry about Indonesia.

    Is the divide in opinion about these matters mostly between the urban/rural, old/young, or a mix of both?

  6. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Friends,

    It seems like finally the government and DPR are waking up. Although it is true some Indonesians can see the lies in the foreign reporting, many of our brothers and sisters are too busy in the grind of everyday life. What’s wrong with giving them a helping hand as Pancasilaists ?

    Indeed, much foreign reporting focuses on pornography and immoral themes. Many of these so-called foreign journalists repeatedly allege:

    – There is corruption in Indonesia
    – There is human rights abuse in Indonesia
    – The government makes an inefficient policy
    – Indonesia is full of terrorists

    It seems they are pursuing a ferocious agenda to discredit my country.

    Besides, as mentioned, you never know just who these journalists are. Pak Djoko realises this, and is just trying to do his job. Can’t we support him — why do we have to focus on all the negative things like the Maria Eva scandal. Surely they are human as well.

    Thanks, Friend.

    Increase Da Peace
    Achmad.

  7. avatar Peter says:

    Gee, maybe if people were more concerned about their own government corruption and internal fighting instead of international gossip, then there would be less bad things for the foreign press to report.

  8. avatar Grace and Mercy says:

    Are things like this proposed all the time, but never instituted in Indonesia? Or is this a new trend (i.e. pornoaksi, etc.)?

    Stuff like this makes me worry about Indonesia.

    Is the divide in opinion about these matters mostly between the urban/rural, old/young, or a mix of both?

    Hi Peter,

    It is indeed a new trend like you said, and I believe this is the by-product of an immature democracy. After the fall of Soeharto we as a nation experienced a euphoria. Suddenly any kind of media publications you can imagine can have the permit of publishing. Not too long afterwards, gun permits were issued to just about anyone with money. All of this in the name of and for the sake of democracy. “FREEDOM!!” they say.

    Then we as a nation realize that “freedom!” without any sort of control leads to chaos, which is the opposite of freedom itself.

    And the nation reacts by wanting to do damage control of that chaos by proposing a tight grip on things considered “on the loose”. Imaturely of course. Therefore such proposals surface. Little do we know, too tight of a grip leads to oppression.

    We as a nation have a lot of growing up to do.

  9. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Thanks Grace and Mercy,

    Ibu Grace helps to argue that journalists need to be taught proper Pancasila values. They are immature, euphoric and ‘drunk’ on media freedom. Friends, Islam forbids getting drunk.

    Peace,

    Achmad

  10. avatar Rambutan says:

    Achmad Sudarsono,

    you said:

    “Indeed, much foreign reporting focuses on pornography and immoral themes”

    Sorry, but this is simply not true. CNN, BBC, VoA do not report on ‘immoral themes’, what ever that might be. The worst reporting comes from the so-called infotainment, which is 100% Indoensian.

    Anyway, Pak Djoko is NOT talking about amoral reports. He just can’t stand having foreign views broadcasted in Indonesia. Djoko is a journalist himself. He should know better than trying to censor news. What does he want? Does he think Indonesian reporting is balanced and fair just because it’s written by Indonesians? Be real, Pak Djoko. In the end, he is just an old-style, hard-line nationalist with worrying anti-democratic ideas.

    Furthermore Achmad said:

    “Many of these so-called foreign journalists repeatedly allege:

    – There is corruption in Indonesia
    – There is human rights abuse in Indonesia
    – The government makes an inefficient policy
    – Indonesia is full of terrorists”

    Hmm, let’s see if those allegations are true: Corruption? No doubt about that, I guess. Human rights abuses? Certainly in the past. You would not refute that I hope. Nowadays Indonesia has a much better human rights record BUT as the Munir case proves certainly not a perfect one. Inefficient policies? Well, we could argue about that. True to some extent I would say. Full of terrorists? Here I would agree that the foreign press likes to convey a misleading picture and exaggerate. However, as the recent events in Poso show, there certainly are terrorist networks operating in Indoensia.

    So, to sum it up. No need to be afraid of foreign reporting and no need to sensor it. Don’t repeat the mistakes from the past.

  11. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Rambutan,

    Many thanks for your whole-hearted support of my writing. I really appreciate it. There are few people who understand me like you do.

    The foreign press does indeed exaggerate what happens in Indonesia. We live in the world’s third-largest democracy. Because our press isn’t controlled by the Konglomerat, we are more democratic than the United States. What more a blatant example of KKN is there than George W. Bush becoming President after his father. The irony is that in Indonesia, KKN was a malicious device invented by those blasted foreign journalists trying to discredit my country.

    Friend, ok, maybe no need to censor the foreign news, but as we know it is 100% wrong, why not save the authorities the trouble and do it ourselves – that is just not print it, broadcast it, or webcast it?

    Friend, you know this is the best way, the Pancasila, way.

    Peace,

    Achmad

  12. avatar Colson says:

    Grace and Mersey ( nice alias, by the way) have an intriqueing point by wondering if these kind of proposals are the by-product of an immature society. Elsewhere the same phenomenon can be observed. These kind of tendencies, but considerably worse, occur in former communist East European countries and the former Sowjet Union. Typical immature democracies.

    In 1989/1990 the communists regimes were toppled and “freedom” in the brand new “democracies “Wild West style”, was established. Fifteen years on one can see the backlash; Mr Putin for instance, fed up with foreign influences, once more controls the economy, controls the press and gets his opponents in Russia murdered. Russia has developed from a anarchy-democracy into a perversity of democracy. Everything should be done to prevent that in Indonesia.

    Of course a wild west neo-liberal economy – a few corrupt people getting incredibly rich and the vast majority of the population experiencing nothing but misery because they are not protected by law and officials andsuffer from the absence of any substantial social policy- is lethal for a free society. Here the Indonesian government should put all her effort. There’s a great need for more equality.

    And of course unihibited cultural liberal change implies the breach of a lot of taboos in a cultural predominantly conservative and religious society like Indonesia. Nevertheless this kind of change has been taking place. Maybe libertarians should show some moderation now in order to prevent a total counter revolution of the all out conservatives. But on the other hand all information ought to be available to all Indonesians to keep in step with the world at large.

  13. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Pak Colson,

    Interesting that you take four long paragraphs to say what any writer could say in a couple of sentences.

    New democracies sometimes see steps backwards.

    New democracies need to be careful in the early stages so as not to scare people into a knee-jerk embrace of what’s familiar, ie authoritarian rule.

    What are you trying to do – get a writing grant from the Soros foundation ?

    Increase Da Peace.

    Achmad

  14. avatar Peter says:

    Achmad, what’s the animosity for?

    And who do you think you are, anyway? “Increase da Peace” …lol.

  15. avatar Ali says:

    Achmad said:

    Many thanks for your whole-hearted support of my writing. I really appreciate it. There are few people who understand me like you do.

    May I suggest dropping concentrated vinegar in your eyes before reading? 🙂

    What are you trying to do – get a jihad fund from al qaeda?

  16. avatar Colson says:

    Dear Mr Achmad,

    Gosh, you revealed my secret. Do you hate me now you know George and I are buddies?

  17. avatar Peter says:

    * And who do you think you are, anyway? Ali G? “Increase da Peace” “¦lol.

  18. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Pak Colson,

    Nothing to do with conspiracies; Soros foundation known for handing out money on the basis of waffley discourses about democracy. See George Orwell, “politics and the english language” ; shorter is better.

    Other friends, Ali and Peter, just a friendly reminder to stay on track on this discussion and avoid comments that veer towards the personal. Apart from anything else, it hurts my feelings a bit when you’re mean.

    Most people who come here don’t do so just to read silly statements, paranoia and insults, but rather intelligent, focused comments on current affairs.

    I come here to Make a Friend and…

    Sava Da Flava…
    and….
    Increase Da Peace

  19. avatar Hassan says:

    Achmad Sudarsono:

    “Friends, Islam forbids getting drunk.”

    Indeed, but how come you don’t sound too sober, Mr. Pak Achmad Yth.

    Sava Da Liqua?
    and…
    Increase Da Hangova

  20. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Hassan,

    I think you’re being a bit mean and as a Muslim I find it offensive that you are talking about getting drunk.

    But let’s get this conversation back on track: talking about keeping foreigners off Indonesian airwaves and out of the print here.

    Thanks friends.

    Maximum Respect,
    Big Up Yo’self.

  21. avatar PS3 says:

    Achmad,

    It seems that you have something against the US but ironically those lines such as Yo’self and Da peace are all imported from the US.

    “Because our press isn’t controlled by the Konglomerat, we are more democratic than the United States.”

    How do you justify this statement?

    “What more a blatant example of KKN is there than George W. Bush becoming President after his father”

    Ahmad, that is not KKN. George Bush was elected by the people not by his dad . It was not like George Bush Sr appointed directly his son (George.W.Bush) to become a president.

    The irony is that in Indonesia, KKN was a malicious device invented by those blasted foreign journalists trying to discredit my country.

    I don’t know where did you get this information from. But KKN has been around since thousand of years ago. Raja/patih appointed his son to become the new king.
    We shouldn’t blame foreigners for our own bad judgements.

    Friend, ok, maybe no need to censor the foreign news, but as we know it is 100% wrong, why not save the authorities the trouble and do it ourselves – that is just not print it, broadcast it, or webcast it?

    Why is it wrong Ahmad? What is wrong about it?

    It is sad because you proclaim where you stand but the way you talk you are influenced by western’s culture as well. I bet you don’t think that’s bad for you, infact maybe you don’t realize that you have been influenced. Because the culture isn’t as bad as you thought.

  22. avatar Hassan says:

    PS3: Pak Achmad Yth. was just pulling your chains, he’s always fooling around. He is taking a side (as in a role playing situation), a side that people hates. But I think he liked it that way.

  23. avatar Ihaknt says:

    Hassan for the first time, I loved your posting! It’s very funny :D. heheheh.

  24. avatar Achmad Sudarsono says:

    Actually, Friends, there’s already a kind of censorship going on in the foreign press, and a much more dangerous one.

    The likes of Djoko Susilo are quite crass and obvious. Whenever they say something dumb like the statements in Pak Patung’s article, people like you folks, AJI (assosiasi wartawan Indonesia), jump all over them. Besides, this is surprising as Djoko’s been a foreign correspondent in the ‘States. (Maybe the NYT didn’t offer him a fat retainer to be a columnist?)

    The scary censorship going on right now is from Deplu, BIN and the TNI. There’s an inter-departmental committee that meets once a month to review journalist’s visa applications. They hardly ever issue short-term visas anymore. That drastically limits the amount of foreign journalists who can come in.

    The committee limits the foreign journalists to the Jakarta-based pool of reporters. It’s easier to keep an eye on them. And getting their work permit rejected is a lot more costly. Seen many foreign reports coming out of Papua lately? No. Correspondents have to beg Deplu to get admitted, then think carefully before they write.

    The world hasn’t really noticed this. In general, Indonesia’s press is among the most-free in Asia, perhaps too free if you can get away with filming escaping prisoners get shot on prime-time TV (Kriminal).

    But the committee is a much cleverer way of keeping foreign journalists in line. Besides, you can’t censor the news. You can get it on the internet.

    What’s Djoko going to do? Patrol the warnets?

  25. avatar Grace and Mercy says:

    Hi Colson,

    Just a background on my nick name “Grace and Mercy” = By God’s Grace I was given Mercy.

    What you said

    Maybe libertarians should show some moderation now in order to prevent a total counter revolution of the all out conservatives.

    is interesting. The things I see happening here from the surface may have the characteristic of Libertarianist idealism but i doubt that it is that in a true form. If Libertarianism is the believe that every person is the absolute owner of his own life and should be free to do whatever he wishes with his person or property, as long as he respects the liberty of others, the way i see it (and of course this is just my opinion) many do not respect the liberty of others here. Sadly what’s happening seem more like anarchy to me.

    Again this is just my opinion and I am by no means a real student of political thought.

  26. avatar Dan says:

    I agree with the reduction of content if it is merely broadcasts of ‘voice of America’ and other propagandist machines. American Internal content is useful, media outlets such as pbs.org and ajizeera.com would be both american outlets that enable an educated group in Indonesia to understand why decisions are being made, both within America, Western Countries and in Asian countries. But Voice of America doesnt fit into this category, it is more a propagandist voice of the ‘American Way’ with Heavy bias against ‘the Non American Way’.

    Nobody should agree to using Indonesian infrastructure to broadcast this complete rubbish. Its not censorship to Shut up voice of America, it’s a reasoned decision making. The money used to broadcast ‘Voice of America’ would be better spent improving conditions of people living in Indonesia and in educating them about their own governments system.

    Joko Susilo Does have a point in what he is saying, he’s talking about costs to broadcast what has no relevance to day to day actuality for Indonesians. Voice of America could be provided free to users of the Internet only, and also to community access points with internet througout Indonesia, but radio and television should not be the medium. People who want to hear it, should have to pay for it.

    Anyway thats my Thoughts…a few musings.

  27. avatar Colson says:

    Of course The Voice of America is downright propaganda. But why shouldn’t we be entitled to look at or listen to information – whether it will be biased or not – we want? Independent of our income or wealth, that is.

  28. avatar Rambutan says:

    Dan,

    who will decide what is worthy being aired and what not? Who decides what is right and what is wrong, what is good for Indonesia and what classifies as “rubbish”? Maybe the people in power decide then that CNN, BBC is also ‘foreign propaganda’? And limiting certain kind of information to certain groups, dependant on income or education is absurd.

    Sorry, but it’s time to wake up. It’s the 21st century, it’s the digital age. Indonesia is democraticising and should be increasingly open to the world. There is just no need for this kind of censorship.

  29. avatar Robert says:

    Rambutan,

    Sorry, but it’s time to wake up. It’s the 21st century, it’s the digital age. Indonesia is democraticising and should be increasingly open to the world. There is just no need for this kind of censorship

    You are right. When a society is democraticising this should go along with a matching attitude and censorship is definitely not a part of this attitude.
    Censorship is the tool of dictators and not a tool which belongs in a democracy.

    The further technology progresses, the more open society becomes and more information becomes available. Especially since the internet has entered our society. Probably some governments are afraid they will loose control over the flow of information and turn to censorship as a tool of regaining control. However when censorship is applied to foreign television broadcasts, the information will reach the public anyway via other channels like internet.

  30. avatar Peter says:

    Maybe they should decide which music is rubbish, also… And while they’re at it, they can decide which clothing brands are rubbish, and which foods..

Comment on “Foreign Radio & Television”.

RSS
RSS feed
Email

Copyright Indonesia Matters 2006-18
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Contact