Religious Symbolism in Election Posters

Mar 24th, 2009, in IM Posts, by

Usage of religious symbolism in politics, examples of election campaign posters.

Minister of Religion Maftuh Basyuni said recently that political parties contesting the 2009 general elections should not make use of religious symbols as a way of convincing voters of the legitimacy of their political platforms, that voting was a private, personal concern not connected to religion, and he worried that usage of religious symbolism in politics would endanger harmony among groups in society. antara

Meanwhile, more specifically, Majelis Ulama Indonesia (MUI) leader in Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB), Prof. H. Syaiful Muslim, asked candidates not to use verses from the Quran in their electioneering efforts and materials. antara

Following are a number of roadside banners and billboards for candidates where religion is explicitly or implicitly invoked, blatantly or mildly, not necessarily 'objectionably' within the frame of reference of Basyuni and S. Muslim:


Golkar Christian solidarity, Surabaya.


Mixing it up, the Cross & jilbab, PDS.


The secular nationalism of the PDI-P, Jombang.


Lots of jilbabed women sitting together, PDI-P, Surabaya.


I too wear something on my head, PKNU.


Demokrat, Surabaya


Demokrat, Blitar


Choose the Kabah, PPP, Kalimantan.


Hadith verse, PKS, Bogor.


30 Comments on “Religious Symbolism in Election Posters”

  1. avatar diego says:

    I was wondering, among those in the pictures, which one(s) would fit in “javanese islam muslim” image?

  2. avatar Lairedion says:

    Most of these banners are to be considered “haram” and un-Islamic.

    There are too many women displayed. Women should not get involved in politics but take care of children, cleaning and cooking, preferably at home. Perhaps the minister should worry about that. To pick out two banners.

    1. On the PDS-banner we see a Muslim woman siding with the Christians kaffir.
    2. On the Demokrat banner we see a non-jilbabed woman next to Arabic written text.

    Astaghfirullah!

  3. avatar diego says:

    @Lairedion,

    But I thought islam allows woman to be involved in politics…. Remember mohammed’s (PBUH) rich non-underaged wife (PBUH?)?

    Walahualam.

  4. avatar Lairedion says:

    diego,

    I honestly don’t know. I’m just repeating here what I used to hear from a nearby pasantren during my childhood in West Java….

  5. avatar diego says:

    @Lairedion,

    Ok then, I hope “Sheikh Jaka Sombong a.k.a the artist formerly known as Barry Prima, the punk bule” would enlighten us.

  6. avatar Burung Koel says:

    Careful, you may have summoned him…

  7. avatar Lairedion says:

    LOL, I’m sure he’ll come up with some Feng Shui yoga logic to explain Mo’s wifes involvement in politics.

  8. avatar fullmoonflower says:

    hmmmmm….. 🙄

    I don’t care about election… real Yogya people usually are Golput… No matter it is haram or not… 😀

  9. avatar Cukurungan says:

    Most of these banners are to be considered “haram” and un-Islamic.

    There are too many women displayed. Women should not get involved in politics but take care of children, cleaning and cooking, preferably at home.

    Pak Ustadz Lairedion Yth,

    Congratulation that you are finally joint our undefeatable ranks, as we speak our kids is suffering and our home is full of trash while our food is so sour because our woman is too busy on Kampanye Pemilu while our reverse UFO technology engineering has failed to materialize ROBOT who could replace our women to take care daily house work.

  10. avatar fullmoonflower says:

    huehehe… 😆

    sssssttttt…. Kang Cuk, don’t speak too loud, or Komisi Pemberdayaan Wanita will gives you a little slap…. (ouch!)

    xixixixi…

    but I am agree with you …. even I always be busy too as a career woman, but what can I do, I have to do it for living, you know… I have to keep it as my destiny…

    hehehe 😀

  11. avatar fullmoonflower says:

    hmmmmm… 🙄

    see the posters… the men and women… how beautiful and bright they are… seems like new stars….

    but I just imagine this scene… few months after election they will stay in VIP room in mental hospital… can you imagine? 😆

  12. avatar ET says:

    Minister of Religion Maftuh Basyuni said recently that political parties contesting the 2009 general elections should not make use of religious symbols as a way of convincing voters of the legitimacy of their political platforms, that voting was a private, personal concern not connected to religion, and he worried that usage of religious symbolism in politics would endanger harmony among groups in society.

    The Minister is right. First thing he should do is ban the jilbab’s and hijab’s from the banners and billboards.

  13. avatar fullmoonflower says:

    @ ET…

    halah… gubraks!!! sudah terlanjur… 😛
    they’ve wasted a lot of money, even take big loan, to make the billboards… and then finally they will put them to the VIP room in mental hospital… 😆

  14. avatar hary says:

    I wonder if the party using the Salib seriously thinks its going to get elected.

  15. avatar andrey says:

    I’ve never heard any ban for woman to be involved in any job/position other than to be leader of a country, and to lead a prayer where the is an able man in the congregation .

    Most ban against woman doing this or doing that that you hear from Saudi Arabia or Afghanistan usually indirectly derived from something else.
    For example: woman must not have physical contact, or to be alone with unrelated man (and vice versa). The Saudis and the Talibans take this and decide that since it will be difficult to prevent male police and female driver to have some physical contact when the driver got pulled off, or between female students and male teachers/class mates in a mixed class, same of them think it would be practical to discourage female driving or female going to school.

    Of course, we can get same result without a ban, for example by employing female police, female teacher, single gender schools, etc. I honestly don’t know why the Saudis or the Talibans do not take this way.
    may be it is cultural, or simply a practical decision driven by necessity (due to limited fund available, in case of the taliban.)

    In case of Indonesia, just look at the abundance of women on the pks ticket.

  16. avatar Burung Koel says:

    and then finally they will put them to the VIP room in mental hospital…

    It will save the cost of new wallpaper, though!

  17. avatar fullmoonflower says:

    xixixi…. 😆

    my Yogya community members keep talking about it… since RSJ Surakarta, RSJ Lali Jiwo Pakem, RSJ Ludiro Husada Magelang published they’ve prepared VIP Rooms special for un-elected candidates….

    😆

  18. avatar Cukurungan says:

    but I am agree with you …. even I always be busy too as a career woman, but what can I do, I have to do it for living, you know… I have to keep it as my destiny…

    Of course there is always exception otherwise who will handle my taxation problem hehehe

  19. avatar enigmatic says:

    ET Says:
    March 24th, 2009 at 1:02 pm

    Minister of Religion Maftuh Basyuni said recently that political parties contesting the 2009 general elections should not make use of religious symbols as a way of convincing voters of the legitimacy of their political platforms, that voting was a private, personal concern not connected to religion, and he worried that usage of religious symbolism in politics would endanger harmony among groups in society.

    The Minister is right. First thing he should do is ban the jilbab’s and hijab’s from the banners and billboards.

    I second him.

  20. avatar David says:

    Most of these banners are to be considered “haram” and un-Islamic.

    There are too many women displayed. Women should not get involved in politics but take care of children, cleaning and cooking, preferably at home. Perhaps the minister should worry about that. To pick out two banners.

    1. On the PDS-banner we see a Muslim woman siding with the Christians kaffir.
    2. On the Demokrat banner we see a non-jilbabed woman next to Arabic written text.

    Astaghfirullah!

    By who? All the Islam based parties are running plenty of women candidates so they don’t seem to have a problem with it.

    I’ve never heard any ban for woman to be involved in any job/position other than to be leader of a country,

    Yes, and sometimes provincial leadership problems, the PKS East Java didn’t support Khofifah Indar Parawansa for governor, it seems because she was female. But generally the Islam based parties have plenty of women running for them, women are their real base and support I would say anyway…..especially the PKS.

  21. avatar Lairedion says:

    P, if I’m not allowed a little sarcasm here please say so.

    Perhaps I misunderstood your post as these banners are laughable and ridiculous. If there’s a strong supporter of gender equity it would be me.

  22. avatar diego says:

    Woman can be…

    anything

    … as long as not in the “imam” position.

    *Ok, I’m not authentic here, I copied AS’ style in cutting the sentences* 🙂

  23. avatar fullmoonflower says:

    sssssttttt… Kang Cuk… jangan keras-keras ngomongnya

    anyway, your tax report will be done tomorrow… don’t worry… 😀

  24. avatar Modest Belle says:

    If the country isn’t govern by a religious regime than why use religion as a platform for political gain? It shouldn’t be done.

  25. avatar The Bitch says:

    Been joining the mainstream of Once-in-every-5-Year-Bullshit, eh? I don’t believe any of them, though. be it the ones in posters or those who could not afford even a single xeroxed pamphlet.

    I believe only in revolution. kill ’em all, anyone?

    *evilgrins*

  26. avatar Suryo Perkoso says:

    Modest Belle Says:

    March 28th, 2009 at 5:32 pm
    If the country isn’t govern by a religious regime than why use religion as a platform for political gain? It shouldn’t be done.

    Tony Blair used it to some effect.

  27. avatar schmerly says:

    @ SP…

    Tony Blair used it to some effect.

    WHAT!!! enlighten me.

  28. avatar Isana says:

    Simple fact: Religion is political. That’s freakin’ awful, but religion DOES sell.

  29. avatar zekky says:

    Tony Blair used it [religion] to some effect.

    I think a lot of this mirrors the politicisation of religion across the globe, or at least in Asia and Europe-America. But in Indonesia, at least, I’ve noticed many Indonesians seem to think that making religion “private” makes them look irreligious or even atheistic.

  30. avatar chris says:

    Are the voting for a president or a religious leader?

Comment on “Religious Symbolism in Election Posters”.

RSS
RSS feed
Email

Copyright Indonesia Matters 2006-15
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Contact