Hijab Solidarity

Sep 7th, 2007, in IM Posts, by

International Hijab Solidarity Day is marked in Semarang.

About 300 university students from Lembaga Dakwah Kampus (LDK), or the Campus Preaching Council (LDK), marked the International Hijab Solidarity Day in Semarang, Central Java, on 4th September.

"International Hijab Solidarity Day" was declared at a conference of the Assembly for the Protection of Hijab held on July 12th, 2004, in London.

Jilbab
Already gotten the message.

The date of 4th September was chosen because, as protest leader Lulu Jamaliah says, that was the date in 2002 that France banned Muslim women from wearing the jilbab/hijab.

Lulu said that the rally had two specific purposes, to show that wearing the hijab was a human right and no state should prevent women from doing so, and secondly to encourage jilbab-less women to put on the head covering. For the second purpose the demonstrators gave away free hijabs to passing women, as well as flowers.

Lulu Jamaliah said she was also concerned that most Indonesian Muslim women didn't seem to care about worldwide jilbab solidarity. [1]


47 Comments on “Hijab Solidarity”

Pages: [1] 2 »

  1. avatar Sylvester says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 4:39 am

    The purpose of using jilbab (covering head) actually was to protect against sandstorm and extreme temperature in the middle east desert. Even men also wore this stuff. But now the moron evil Arabs want to spread this culture all over the world by saying it could protect women from rape. Ridiculous.
    Beware of Arabisation.

  2. avatar Joy says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 5:37 am

    “Lulu said that the rally had two specific purposes, to show that wearing the hijab was a human right and no state should prevent women from doing so, and secondly to encourage jilbab-less women to put on the head covering”.

    and Joy says:
    It is a human right also “not to wear hijab”.

  3. avatar Ronald says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 10:34 am

    Yes Joy, I agree with you. Not wearing hijab is a human right and no country should oblige a woman to wear it.

  4. avatar Djoko says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 11:16 am

    The state should neither enforce nor ban the wearing of jilbab/hijab. Simple as that. People can argue for either side (the demonstrators for example were handing out free jilbabs as part of their dakwah no doubt, and sylvester has made it clear from his viewpoint that it’s a bit useless in a place like Indonesia from a purely practical point of view), but in the end it’s up to the individual.

  5. avatar Boni says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 1:37 pm

    The problem is if i’m not mistaken there is a country in Europe that forbid women wear hijab. I personally don’t think that is fair even though I’m not a moslem. I think women should have freedom to choose what to wear.

  6. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 5:10 pm

    Dear friends,

    Hijab should be banned as it can still arouse men. I opt for a International “Burqa Solidarity” Day.

    Salam.

  7. avatar Robert says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 10:21 pm

    Boni,

    The problem is if i’m not mistaken there is a country in Europe that forbid women wear hijab.

    No, this is a misunderstanding, the countries you are referring to are France and Turkey.
    In France, according to a new law it is not allowed to wear religious symbols (headscarf, crucifix etc.) in places like public schools (middle- and highschools). This law is applicable to all religions.
    In Turkey it is not allowed for women to wear an headscarf in universities and public places.

  8. avatar Odinius says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 11:55 pm

    See, it actually looks kinda hot on the girl in the middle, the other two, not so much.

  9. avatar Pena Budaya says:
    September 8th, 2007 at 12:26 am

    The date of 4th September was chosen because, as protest leader Lulu Jamaliah says, that was the date in 2002 that France banned Muslim women from wearing the jilbab/hijab.

    In 2 September 2004, French law on secularity and conspicuous religious symbols in schools was came into effect – if that is what Lulu Jamaliah meant. She is totally lost. Poor girl. She gets misleading information. Better did research than sounds stupid.

    French has never banned any Muslim women from wearing jilbab but French banned the apperance of any religious symbol in schools. This law is an application from French fundamental principle of the separation of church and state that has been applied since 1905.

    Furthermore, I agree with such of law that French applied and aimed for – that any religious symbols or teaching should not be enforced to children. Let children choose their own religions, they have free will and should not be indoctrinated by parents’ religions. Why should children always follow parents’ religions? In arguing that kids need moral guidance and religions are the only ways..well, teach them the principles of human rights and being humanist..that will do. We are evoluted anyway..

  10. avatar Robert says:
    September 8th, 2007 at 1:35 am

    The date of 4th September was chosen because, as protest leader Lulu Jamaliah says, that was the date in 2002 that France banned Muslim women from wearing the jilbab/hijab.

    Wrong. This law was about religious symbols being worn in schools. In schools only and concerning every religion.

  11. avatar Odinius says:
    September 8th, 2007 at 2:18 am

    Yup, Jewish boys can’t wear yarmulkes, Christians can’t wear large crucifixes (though I guess they can wear discreet ones).

    But it became a “Muslim thing” because there are almost no Jews in france and the Christians barely go to church, let alone wear giant crucifixes.

    I’m not a fan of the law, because as much as I think religion should stay out of public school (except in a teaching world religions context), students shouldn’t be inhibited from following their beliefs as long as they don’t distract from teaching and/or harm others.

    A burqa would be distracting, a hijab, not really.

  12. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:
    September 8th, 2007 at 7:58 am

    I think September 11 should be chosen as International Burqa Solidarity Day as this marks the day when the Jews and their CIA minions conspired to discredit our ulamah.

  13. avatar Dream says:
    September 8th, 2007 at 9:45 pm

    As expected from Islam, all people should follow/agree to its quran….if not, JIHAD….

  14. avatar Bas says:
    September 9th, 2007 at 12:33 am

    France never banned Muslim women from wearing the jilbab/hijab. Only in public schools. And that is not only for muslim women.

    This is 100% normal. Religious signs have nothing to do in the “ecole de la republique” where children must be equal. If you want to show religious attributes go private. There are plenty of private school who will welcome jilbabed heads.

    France, like other European countries is a real democracies with a real cult and religious freedom, unlike Indonesia and Islamic countries all over the world.

    And France respect the Human right bill (which comes from France) that says you can marry whoever you want (I though Indonesia had signed the international bill… so why can’t you marry someone from another religion?). In France anti-segregation laws make forbidden to ask what is your religion when you apply for a job or for any kind of document or service. Once again that is not the case in Indonesia where your religion is written in you ID card and when you are asked for your religion when opening a bank account, applying for a job or a visa or a school. Indonesia is a segregationist country.

  15. avatar Peter says:
    September 9th, 2007 at 12:41 am

    There is no verse in the Quran which mandates any specific dress code for Muslim women. It just tells them to be modest and not to expose their “charms”. So it is up to each woman to decide how she wants to interpret that injunction. It is not a matter for Islamic scholars to decide. That would be an attempt to come in between a believer and Allah, and this is forbidden in Islam. That is why there is no Muslim priesthood.. although many people try to issue fatwas these days as if they are the sole authority on Islam. Verily, Allah knows what they do, and He is swift in judgement. (to speak Quranically)

    By the way the middle girl is lucu, ya?

  16. avatar Falcon says:
    September 9th, 2007 at 11:49 am

    Wearing Hijab makes one may think being immaculate and free from sins. Ironic is it. They are hypocrates, un Indonesian.

  17. avatar Sylvester says:
    September 10th, 2007 at 4:35 am

    The analogy is:
    To fight against virus (evil), islam focuses on disinfect the surrounding, which also affect other harmless organisms (non moslem).
    Christian, Buddhism, etc focus on how to make the body healthy and improve the immunity system without harming others.

  18. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:
    September 10th, 2007 at 6:51 pm

    Re,

    …..it actually looks kinda hot on the girl in the middle,……

    by Odinius.

    By the way the middle girl is lucu, ya?

    by Peter.

    I think they are all hotties. I am going to tell mom about this.

  19. avatar dewaratugedeanom says:
    September 11th, 2007 at 3:18 pm

    This Hijab Solidarity Day has my full support.
    The chicks in the picture are incredibly sexy. I can hardly control myself. But without hijab they would certainly turn me off.
    Bring on the nubiles!

  20. avatar Enigmatic says:
    September 12th, 2007 at 8:04 pm

    Aluang Anak Bayang Says: +0

    September 10th, 2007 at 6:51 pm
    Re,

    “¦..it actually looks kinda hot on the girl in the middle,”¦”¦

    by Odinius.

    By the way the middle girl is lucu, ya?

    by Peter.

    I think they are all hotties. I am going to tell mom about this.

    Hey look who’s aroused!!

  21. avatar Teta says:
    September 13th, 2007 at 8:22 pm

    The middle girl is lucu. Wonder if she’ll want to go dugem with me either in Crown or Millenium.

  22. avatar Tuan says:
    October 21st, 2007 at 12:06 pm

    More power to the sisters. I am thankful for living in a country that guarantees religious expression and not buttf*ck Europe.

  23. avatar Aaron says:
    June 23rd, 2008 at 6:47 am

    They look ugly with that veil. The world should ban. Let women be free and not have to cover up everything, especially when it’s hot. Let the scalp breathe!!!!!!

    Yey for France. Those that don’t like it can try Saudi Arabia.

  24. avatar M says:
    June 24th, 2008 at 6:08 pm

    anybody wears hijab here? except me?
    sometimes i think it’s odd that some women wear high heels on a rocky road or miniskirt in winter time. but if they let me wear head scarf in tropical country, why wud i bother them? each and every one of us has religion. theirs, perhaps fashion, mine’s islam.

  25. avatar Muhammad Ali says:
    August 4th, 2008 at 9:45 pm

    Everybody has the right to wear what ever he she prefers to wear, whether it be the niqab, hijab, burka, or a G-string bikini. But regarding to the public domain, then there would always be some measures of restrictions.

    So basically its the same, whether in Saudi or England, there is always that control of what woman ought to wear and how much she should cover. There’s no difference, its just a matter of degree, not of kind. I mean imagine this: a topless woman walking down a public crowded street. Even in a hot summer day, I now in many western countries the police would take her away, right? Doesn’t she have the right to not wear a bra and shirt, to be topless? If a man was topless would he be arrested? No! Isn’t that showing inequality toward your human rights?

    “Because that’s just off limits,” says the western man.
    “So now who sets the limits?” ask the Muslim.
    “Me!” says the western man
    “Sorry, we Muslims have Allah through the Quran setting the limits for us interpreted by the the majority of the trusted scholars of Islam.” says the Muslim, “and we will enforce it where ever we have the authority to do so just as you do in your country with your own limits.”

    So again, the only difference is that where there is Syariah is applied, the standard or limits is just a little higher then yours because we valued the chastity, beauty and honor of our mothers and sisters just a little higher then you – or is it way higher. Come on, I mean, putting your moms naked on top of a truck advertisement? Or making her have sex simulation in front of the camera just to make her a movie star? Man, where’s is the honor?

  26. avatar tomaculum says:
    August 4th, 2008 at 10:24 pm

    So again, the only difference is that where there is Syariah is applied, the standard or limits is just a little higher then yours because we valued the chastity, beauty and honor of our mothers and sisters just a little higher then you – or is it way higher.
    Let us higher in your, your religions and your cultures scale, M. Ali.
    For the westerner is a proof of respect to your sisters and mothers to let them their freedom, even if they masturbating in front of a camera.
    Let us stop judging what is better or not. Every human being (and every human being’s thought is influenced and formed by their culture and religion/belief).
    Isn’t it fact, that in the rigorous islamic countries the women do have barely rights (to go to school, to express their opinions etc, etc), that they are usually forced to marry someone they didn’t even know before?
    And you say you value the honor of those women higher? What is your definition of honor? You will see that your definition is different to those from the western culture.
    Chastity isn’t very important value in the western culture. So what? Matter of taste, matter of understanding, isn’t it?
    Beauty: why shouldn’t women show their beauty? One show hers almost naked, the other express it with a barely make up and “polite” clothes.
    And muslima have to hide their beauty behind chador. Its your business.
    So, why judging? Why saying: mine is better, yours is disgusting.
    Let your God (whoever, wherever he is) judge it.
    Go into your hermitage, read your holy books, think about it, let your God enlightend you. Stop railing against others.

  27. avatar tomaculum says:
    August 4th, 2008 at 11:09 pm

    Let us higher in your
    I meant It is.
    Sorry.

  28. avatar Muhammad Ali says:
    August 4th, 2008 at 11:57 pm

    Pak/Ibu Tomaculum,

    That’s just my point. You are being hypocritical, judging muslim countries who apply the Syariah as being rigid, and then calling western countries as valuing freedom, freedom, freedom, where as there is no real freedom. Like the topless woman case I presented to you. She doesn’t have that freedom to be topless because there is the law that restricts her.

    So, there is no real freedom, rather merely standards. So people who criticize the Islamic Syariah (Law) based on the argument of freedom is being very hypocritical because you also have your own Western Law (Syariah) which restricts freedom to some extent.

    This is the problem, when we start showing you that your basically do the same thing – restricting, not giving freedom – then all you can say is “hey, (quote) Let us stop judging what is better or not…” Hey, man, who started it in the first place? This is only “International Hijab Solidarity Day!” Let us our wives where a hijab and show support among themselves….stop judging!

    So now your judging the muslim women based on merely seeing hijab and all the bad media and – to admit – a great many of ignorant muslims, without knowing what is really happening in the true muslim homes and the true teachings of Islam. Man, we honor our moms, sisters, and wives. I’ll give you the analogy of the Queen Bee. You see the queen bee staying in her nest (palace) while all the male bees go and do the work. Would you call this oppression of male bees to the queen bee of not letting her go out and do some work? No, it’s bee nature! the male bee has his part and the queen be has hers.

    So your quesion: Why shouldn’t women show their beauty?
    Why don’t you ask the police why that woman shouldn’t walk down the street topless or even naked if she wanted?

  29. avatar Lairedion says:
    August 5th, 2008 at 12:04 am

    Are you the Muhammad Ali?

  30. avatar tomaculum says:
    August 5th, 2008 at 12:32 am

    M. Ali,
    even in western country there is a limit set by law and religion, believe it or not. The word freedom is in the western culture not so simple as your example with the topless woman. It has to do with the history of the western culture and the western philosophie. It is a part of the democracy. It is not only allowance to walk in the city naked or topless, it is also regulations for living together, law, tolerance, humanism etc, etc.
    And if you read my comment carefully, you will find out that I do not judging any culture or any country.
    Admittedly I my self do not like the syariah, but who am I judging it?
    There are also something I don’t like in the world I life. As a part of this community I have the right to critize those things I don’t agree with. This is democracy.
    I don’t life in a syariah country, so why should I critize it?
    Once more: I don’t agree with syariah, but its not my business.
    If you read my comment, once again, carefully, you will find that I ask you all stop judging each other.
    Freedom to speak belongs to the western culture too, to the democracy. Even freedom to call other names like hypocritical. I have learned to forswear this kind of freedom, because it belongs to the early development of the western culture I know.

    You wrote about Queen Bee as an example. The nature of the bee queen is to stay in their nest to ensure their progeny. The queen bee doesn’t need to work, she get even her food feeded. I think it is not the nature of a woman only to stay home to cook, to clean the house, to get babies.
    And, M. Ali, a bee is a little bit different to a human, isn’t it?
    Uncommon analogy (for me).
    Tell me, what is the nature of a woman?

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