Lembaga Dakwah Islam

Mar 7th, 2007, in IM Posts, by

The Lembaga Dakwah Islam Indonesia (LDII) is battling to avoid the heretic label.

The Council of Muslim Clerics, (Majelis Ulama Indonesia (MUI)), has in the past viewed some practises of the LDII, the Indonesian Islamic Propagation League, a hardline group in the past linked to the Indonesian Islamic State movement, (Negara Islam Indonesia (NII)), as being "exclusivist" and therefore unacceptable.

The MUI's main objections to LDII concern the latter's worship or prayer routine, and its attitude to other Muslims. For a person to join LDII prayer services he must first register with the LDII, and once prayers have begun no one may leave the room, it was said. The LDII was also accused of teaching that other, non-LDII, Muslims were not quite the real thing.

LDII chief Soehartono Rijadi now says however that the membership and prayer rules are no longer "relevant" and at their upcoming national congress the governing council will agree to change such policies to put their worship practices more in line with other groups in the country like Nadhatul Ulama and Muhammadiyah.

Soehartono hopes that this will enable the LDII to lose the deviant stigma it has recently had, and show that it is not exclusive. He also said that he hopes the MUI will clarify the status of LDII so as to prevent any unpleasantness from the easily excitable masses, as in the case of Jamaah Ahmadiyah in 2005 and 2006. [1]

A day later Maruf Amin of the MUI said the matter of the LDII's deviancy or otherwise was still being discussed.

On the same day Abdullah Syam of the LDII invited people to come to LDII mosques and see that they were not closed to outsiders, and that the teachings did not insult others. [2]


5 Comments on “Lembaga Dakwah Islam”

  1. avatar Sputjam says:
    March 7th, 2007 at 8:47 am

    None of the islamic groups can come up with evidence of rituals worship (5 daily prayers in the koran). The answer is simple. There is none.
    Mohamed failed to convince the Arabs of his time to abandon pagan rituals. When you observe the haj, you will realise that ritual.
    Arabs were stone worshipping pagans. Pray towards the meteorite stone 5 times daily of you wish. For God does not forgive those who worship others besides God.

  2. avatar Odinius says:
    March 14th, 2007 at 7:48 am

    I’m not denying what you say Sputjam–Christianity is also full of adapted paganism, for example Christmas, which is actually the pagan European solstice festival Jul/Yule–but am not convinced either. I am wondering what your evidence is.

  3. avatar qidhir says:
    October 23rd, 2007 at 11:32 am

    Some journalist defined Dakwah as propagation. In some dictionary, propagation can be intrepeted as the spreading of something (a belief or practice) into new regions or synonims with extension. The second intrepetation is the act of producing offspring or multiplying by such production or synonims with generation or multiplication. In other intepretation, propagation is the movement of a wave through a medium.
    Dakwah meaning is different with propagation in principles. In most area, totally different meaning. Propagation is not aware about the truth of thing. It does not care about the content quality. Dakwah should produce truth that based on facts. Dakwah can not produce opinion. opinion should be surrended on individual interest.
    LDII is not propagation institution, but Dakwah institution

  4. avatar catur susini says:
    February 28th, 2011 at 9:53 am

    LDII is one of the legal molsem organitation in Indonesia has done positve doing.For example qurban activity which done annually.It helps many people who need it.

  5. avatar haryanto says:
    February 11th, 2013 at 12:41 am

    I know LDII a lot. It’s not that bad as some people say. LDII is a community that will prove that Islam is a rahmatan lil’alamiin, good not only for moslems but also for others. No need to worry about LDII. Go ahead.



Your view on “Lembaga Dakwah Islam” :


RSS
RSS feed
Email

Copyright Indonesia Matters 2006-14
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Contact