Freddie Numberi

Mar 6th, 2007, in Business & Economy, by

Freddie Numberi warns about foreign mafias attempting to destroy Indonesia.

The only Papuan in the cabinet, as minister for maritime affairs and fisheries, Rear Admiral (retired) Freddie Numberi, accused foreign business mafias of trying to deliberately destroy the Indonesian economy and rob it of its natural resources. The mafias were well cashed-up and paid good money to Indonesians to help them steal the country’s wealth, he said.

Examples were the existence of illegal fishing in Indonesian waters, using very large vessels, and the stealing of sand, the latter being done by foreign contractors working with local businessmen.

Freddie Numberi
Freddie Numberi, with a foreigner.

Certain countries were behind the mafia, and they wanted to wreak havoc on the Indonesian economy, because they worried that with all its abundance of natural resources Indonesia could one day become a force to be reckoned with.

He noted that recently two large ships from China were caught stealing Indonesian fish in the Arafura Sea. The Fu Yuang Yu F68 and the Jong Liong were each carrying about 1350 tons of stolen fish valued at 50 billion rupiah, not small change. He further said that recently there were another eight Chinese flagged ships trawling through Indonesian waters, but they fled to Australia.

A local ship, the KM Bahari Makmur, was also caught engaged in unauthorised fishing.

Freddie said he had information from “A1” reliable sources that the Chinese fishing boats were being supplied with fuel by a 20,000 ton tanker that stayed in international waters, thus proving there was a high level of organisation behind the operations.

The illegal mining of sand from Riau province, later to be sold to Singapore, was done by seven foreign contractors, he said. This was a grievous threat to national integrity especially given that everyone knew that Singapore was an American lackey. The reclamation of the sea in Singapore with Indonesian sand allowed American warships to park themselves much more easily in Singapore, very close to Indonesia, said Freddie.

This is a great threat to Indonesia.

He advocated concerted tough action to deal with the problems, and coordination between the fisheries department, the military, police, and the attorney general’s office. mediaindo


8 Comments on “Freddie Numberi”

  1. 1ndra says:

    Welcome to Indonesia, please visit Aceh first. 🙂

  2. Mohammed Khafi says:

    He should be more concerned with the internal mafia’s which are allowing such things to happen, as a retired Rear Admiral, I am sure that he cannot be unaware of AL’s part in smuggling huge amounts of illegal timber out of the country! Perhaps he is pissed because nobody has included him in on the deals?

    Peace

  3. Bas says:

    Chinese have imported drugs to Indonesia (that’s what I was taught in University of Indonesia). Westerners have imported prostitution (in fact the dutch tried vainly to eradicate it). IMF and US and the Zionists are trying to destroy the great Indonesia economy. And now a pseudo foreign mafia, so pathetic.

    Hey, the all world now knows who you are and what you are worth. No need to hide behind such lies anymore you Indonesian!

    What’s next?

  4. Niamh Piperman says:

    He noted that recently two large ships from China were caught stealing Indonesian fish in the Arafura Sea.

    There’s that semut and gajah again. Australia has a problem with Indonesian fishermen bringing their boats sometimes within sight of land and many Indonesians think it’s so unfair that they should be arrested.

  5. 1ndra says:

    There’s that semut and gajah again. Australia has a problem with Indonesian fishermen bringing their boats sometimes within sight of land and many Indonesians think it’s so unfair that they should be arrested.

    Hmmm, sometimes the traditional fishermen aren’t using gps so they might not know they’ve tresspassed the other country. But this China fishing matter is different, they’re too far from home.

  6. Niamh Piperman says:

    1ndra Says:

    Hmmm, sometimes the traditional fishermen aren’t using gps so they might not know they’ve tresspassed the other country. But this China fishing matter is different, they’re too far from home.

    Granted, I for one am quite critical of how the Aust. govt handles the Indonesian fishermen who happen to stray just over the line – after all there are no road signs. But plenty of then are coming closer and closer, because the waters are increasingly fished out back where they used to fish, that people on the shore can see the Indonesian flag on their boats. They know what they’re doing.

    Even so, the principle is the same no matter how big the difference in boats, technology, or distance from the homeland.

  7. 1ndra says:

    Maybe we should back to traditional fishing, the fishing rod wont tresspass other country.
    But it’s so strange why the Indonesian fishermen should make a high risk by fishing near border while there’re much fish being stealed that clearly show many fishes in inner sea.
    Maybe they’re lacking for long range capability ships.
    Stealing but being stealed, sad but true, ironic.

  8. Oigal says:

    “Hmmm, sometimes the traditional fishermen aren’t using gps so they might not know they’ve tresspassed the other country”

    In the vast majority of cases they are, and not fishing for their villages. Traditional vessels (i.e no GPS etc) are normally turned around not apprehended. However in many cases that not possible as the vessels are floating death traps.

    With less than 6% of Indonesia’s reef’s undamaged, it’s little wonder fisherman are forced further and further from home.

Comment on “Freddie Numberi”.

RSS
RSS feed
Email

Copyright Indonesia Matters 2006-20
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Contact