Royal Doulton

Oct 3rd, 2006, in Business & Economy, IM Posts, by

The Royal Doulton Company is happy with its investment in Indonesia and plans to put another $125 million into its operations here.

Sir Anthony O'Reilly, the chairman of Waterford Wedgwood Plc., the owner of the Royal Doulton brand, met with president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono at the presidential palace in Jakarta on the 2nd and announced that Waterford Wedgwood/Royal Doulton, a manufacturer of ceramic and china dinnerware, would expand its factory at Tangerang, Banten (western Java, near Jakarta) at a cost of 125 million US dollars.

Waterford Wedgwood, which apart from its famous Royal Doulton china cups, plates, and saucers also produces figurines, has two factories in Asia, with the other being located in India. However, according kompas to Trade minister Mari Pangestu's recollection of conversations with Sir Anthony, Indonesia is the preferred location due to the workforce here being more skillful and patient. 150,000 Royal Doulton branded pieces are produced each week at the Indonesian factory.

Ninety-seven percent of the output of Royal Doulton's Indonesian operations are exported, at an annual value of around $30 million. With the new investment, which will also see the development of some research and design facilities, carried out over three years, the company has hopes that this figure will double.

Sir Anthony O'Reilly said on May 20th 2007 that the company plans to raise its ceramic wares production capacity in Indonesia from 6 million to 12 million pieces per year, with manpower requirements going up from 1,350 at present to about 2,000, and a further $25 million being invested.


66 Comments on “Royal Doulton”

  1. avatar Kelpie says:

    I have read many comments regarding the quality of the product and ‘allan’ I hope you don’t ,ind me saying this but the problem you have with your glaze is called ‘crazing’. This does not happen ‘under the pattern’ but after. You see, for example, the plate is biscuit fired (1st firing), then it is glost fired (2nd firing) which means that the plate now has been glazed and is ready for decoration therefore the pattern i.e ‘Old Country Roses’ is put on top of the glaze and not underneath. There are many firings but the 2 firings named above always occur in that order. There can be many firings per item of ware depending on the chosen pattern and the work involved in creating the finished product. My advice would be to return the whole set and ask for a refund. After 5 years that should never happen, mine is 35 years old and still going strong.

    Good luck!

  2. avatar dzul says:

    I am happy when a country has new and expanded opportunities; I am sad when I see a country lose a traditional industry. However, I am neither an economist nor an historian. I will confine my comments to what I know. I have a very large service of Royal Doulton which I have collected over the last quarter century. I can tell the difference between the English made and the Indonesian made items at a glance. The new Indonesian made service is heavier, the surface is glassy, it is completely opaque (forget seeing your fingers through the china when held to the light, a trick my mother taught me to distinguish better porcelain). I will use my Indonesian made pieces when I host gatherings which require a service large enough to accommodate the party. However, I would NEVER assemble a new service of the Indonesian product. I have no ill will towards the Indonesian people. When the china is on table and not subject to touch, it is still quite lovely as far as design is concerned. But it is by no means still fine china. Were I only now beginning to gather my tableware, I would only purchase antique pieces.

  3. avatar Ainitfunny says:

    It is TRUE STUPIDITY to allow counterfeiters to manufacture and market your quality product “as long as YOU, the manufacturer of the original “get your cut”!!!!
    You screw the craftsmen and workers who originally made the quality product, you screw your customers with the knockoffs, and you screw your reputation and business goodwill as well as the public’s trust and your business future!

    So many businesses have gone down the toilet by younger “business grads” forgetting that long term business SUCCESS IS NOT EXCLUSIVELY AND ONLY ABOUT maximizing the PROFIT!!

  4. avatar Bob says:

    I wonder when Lladro collectors will see “Made in Greece” on the bottom of their figurines!. If it’s not made in the country of origin then it is not original.Therefore,by definition, it must be classified as a fake.Would you buy a Rolex watch made in England?. Of course not!.Anything less than absolute integrity in both manufacture and country of origin is totally inarguable and cannot even be considered worth discussing any further!.BAH HUMBUG!!!.

  5. avatar RD_fan says:

    I am a collector of the traditional Royal Doulton and do see a difference in the appearance of these new Asian made pieces. The design has the female figurines taking on a distinctly “American” almost Barbie Doll look. I guess it is a new look that will carve a niche out for them and distinguish them from the pieces of old. I am not too enamoured with the new look but they are not ugly by any means, just very “modern” and with that globalised look that will appeal to a certain clientele
    However I think it is absolute nonsense that these pieces are any cheaper. Nothing could be further from the truth . The traditional English pieces are far cheaper and I am happily buying these and will leave this new era of RD pieces to the new age collector who is probably based in Asia and will support their local manufacture.

  6. avatar Erlynda Kasim says:

    It surprising me that all the beautiful bone china set are produced in Indonesia. But here in Indonesia the price of the china is almost doubled than other country i.e USA. I wonder why it could happen. We buy this on a very high price, some time i would rather buy them from abroad via internet because they are almost half the price here in Indonesia.

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