UU Perfilman

Sep 14th, 2009, in IM Posts, by

Cultural protectionism and Big Brother in Indonesian film making law, the UU Perfilman.

The highly controversial new bill on Film was passed into law (UU Perfilman) by the parliament on September 8th. These are the articles in the law most commented upon:

  • Article 6: Prohibition of depictions of drug use, violence, gambling, as well as pornography, insulting of religion, and provocative, hateful content.
  • Article 7: Prohibition of the screening of films aimed at over 21 audiences in non-cinema locations or open spaces.
  • Article 18: Film makers are required to inform the Minister of Culture and Tourism of the title, story outline and production plan of any prospective film. The Minister will not approve productions that have the same title and/or story as existing films. There is no charge for this process. If approval is granted film production must begin within three months.
  • Article 32: Cinemas must show 60% local content (of course meaning foreign films may only be shown 40% of the time).
  • Article 42: Foreign films which do not uphold correct religious, ethical, moral, and national cultural values are to be prohibited from import.
  • Article 49 & 51: Films and those who work in the film industry are to uphold correct religious, ethical, moral, and national cultural values.
  • Article 53: Regional governments are responsible for enforcing, developing and implementing locally based film policies, in accordance with national law.

Typical of the many derisory and hostile reactions to the law among performers and film producers came from old acting hand Deddy Mizwar, who cried

This country is doomed, this country is doomed!

while threatening to retire as chairman of the National Film Board (Badan Pertimbangan Perfilman Nasional) in protest.

Culture & Tourism minister Jero Wacik defended the bill in nationalistic terms, saying the Indonesian film industry would be boosted immeasurably by Article 32, the 60% local content rule at cinemas.

The Perfilman law can be viewed on Google Docs, as can the old 1992 law.


15 Comments on “UU Perfilman”

  1. avatar Brother Mouzone says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 11:42 am

    Culture & Tourism minister Jero Wacik defended the bill in nationalistic terms, saying the Indonesian film industry would be boosted immeasurably by Article 32, the 60% local content rule at cinemas.

    Actually, I would say that the more likely outcome is that the 21 group will lose a lot of money and the pirate DVD sellers of uncensored western flicks will see a mild increase in their sales.

    This bill is a real piece of work. It’s as if they thought of every possible rule that might stifle creativity and cause a resurgent Indonesian film market to stagnate. Genius. I guess all we’ll be permitted from now on is clones of Ayat Ayat Cinta and Non-Provocative Pocong flicks.

    Mal Ambassador, here I come…

  2. avatar meyra says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 1:14 pm

    It’s so sad that in this 10 years of reform many bills are just so irrational, and UU Perfilman is yet the latest. Scary to think that the industry that would probably be our pillar in future economy is now crippled. Is the DPR really don’t get the consequences? Is there any chance to cut this bill? If there’s a petition or some sort I’d be happy to sign.

  3. avatar ET says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    Do you think it would have stopped after the pornografi law? This is just the beginning and it will only stop when full shariah is in place. One law at a time…

  4. avatar David says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 1:51 pm

    Not sure it’s a shariah issue ET, it’s democracy, when you have small minded village idiots (legislators) having real power and influence. Indonesia is a fairly raw democracy, the parliament actually has some power whereas in more developed democracies the legislature and even the executive are fairly marginal, real power is with the judiciary, public service, elite universities, etc. I’d expect more of this kind of thing but again I don’t think it’s an Islamic issue, although I’d be interested in seeing the breakdown of which parties and figures were most supportive of the bill.

  5. avatar Brother Mouzone says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 1:59 pm

    Agree with Patung; it’s not an Islamic thing, it’s a control thing.

    With such vague terminology as;

    Prohibition of …. hateful content.

    correct religious, ethical, moral, and national cultural values

    You can literally ban pretty much any movie which you don’t want to see the light of day.

  6. avatar ET says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 2:25 pm

    @ Patung

    I’d expect more of this kind of thing but again I don’t think it’s an Islamic issue, although I’d be interested in seeing the breakdown of which parties and figures were most supportive of the bill.

    No laws without lobbying. It certainly would be interesting to see which parties and figures were supportive – the usual parliamentary wheeling and dealing – but even more interesting would be to know who drafted the RUU.

  7. avatar diego says:
    September 14th, 2009 at 8:21 pm

    Prohibition of …. hateful content.

    Great. Does it mean we will no longer see “Abu-bakar-basyir” type of indoctrination in the TV / movies / media anytime soon?

  8. avatar Andy says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 3:49 am

    One interesting point is that no films depicting Timor Leste and the brutality of the Indonesian occupation have been allowed in the country. Balibo is the latest victim.
    Sadly more generations of Indonesians will not be able to accurately learn about their country’s true heritage. Only the sugar coated bits. So life goes on where people grow up thinking sinetron is true art.

  9. avatar Brother Mouzone says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 9:42 am

    @Diego

    Great. Does it mean we will no longer see “Abu-bakar-basyir” type of indoctrination in the TV / movies / media anytime soon?

    In all fairness, I don’t think anyone could say that Indonesian cinema has ever been a hotbed of radical religiosity. What worries me is that the handful of recent Indonesian movies I would actually class as watchable could all have been banned under this legislation;

    Arisan
    Berbagi Suami
    The Long Road to Heaven
    Jamila and the President
    Pintu Terlarang
    Kala

    They probably wouldn’t have even made it to production. Depressing…

  10. avatar diego says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 10:54 am

    Well,

    I can see the reasons for banning such movies:

    Arisan -> gay
    Berbagi suami -> pervert
    The Long Road to Heaven -> umm…
    Jamila and the President -> an insult to the president (the word “president” don’t go well with “jamila”, it sounds slutty).
    Pintu Terlarang -> too seksi (i imagine: if you open the door, lots of leather men will be out to grab you)
    Kala -> somehow linked to gay-ness.

  11. avatar Astrajingga says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 5:41 pm

    We got a big-brother-esque UU Perfilman.
    Prite case, with ITE law, still in court.

    Hutomo Mandala Putra runs for Ketua Umum of Golkar, an Orde Baru party that should have been banned like NAZI in Germany.

    Orde Baru is creeping back to Indonesia.

    Or, probably Orde Baru has never left. It’s the air that every person in the government breath. It’s the mind set of everyone in power and in parliament.

  12. avatar Producer says:
    September 26th, 2009 at 6:54 am

    when Indonesian Cinema died out, Malaysia seems promising. they invite film makers, to gain experience, and economy.
    really, Malaysia isn’t sound like a bad decision for us film makers. so… in your face Gov.!

  13. avatar tito says:
    September 29th, 2009 at 2:49 pm

    Where I can read this ‘controversion’ of UU perfilman????

  14. avatar dennyjp says:
    October 21st, 2009 at 11:06 pm

    Got the keyword “religious”. From which religion(s) does this law refer?

  15. avatar Astrajingga says:
    August 27th, 2010 at 5:59 am

    From which religion(s) does this law refer

    Islam, what else?



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