South Sulawesi Election

Nov 16th, 2007, in News, by

Both Islamic militants and Golkar lose in the South Sulawesi election.

The results for the South Sulawesi Governor's election:

  1. Syahrul Yasin Limpo - 39.5%
  2. Amin Syam - 38.7%
  3. Abdul Aziz Kahar Mudzakkar - 21.7%

Syahrul Yasin Limpo, with about 1.4 million votes, was declared the South Sulawesi governor-elect on 15th November after the General Elections Commission (KPUD) finished its vote count.

Syahrul is the current deputy governor and was backed by the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) and the National Mandate Party (PAN), while Amin is the current Governor, from Golkar.

The third candidate in the November 5th election, Abdul Aziz Kahar Mudzakkar, was supported by the "Koalisi Keumatan dan Kebangsaan" (KKK) and has a reputation as an Islamic militant. He is the son of former Darul Islam/Tentara Islam Indonesia (DI/TII) military commander Kahar Muzakkar, who led a rebellion against the Indonesian state in the 1950's.

He has served as the head of KPSI, Komite Pengerakan Syariat Islam (the Committee to Uphold Islamic Law) in Makassar, South Sulawesi, and has has been the head of the Jemaah Islamiyah affiliated Hidayatullah pesantren in Makassar, a branch of the main Hidayatullah pesantren in Balikpapan, East Kalimantan, although he has never been accused of committing any crimes. polarhome


21 Comments on “South Sulawesi Election”

  1. avatar yuki says:

    Yeah, I think it was unexpected for Golkar to lose in governor’s election in Sulawesi Selatan, in which it won an overwhelming victory over PDI-P in 2004 elections.

  2. avatar Rambutan says:

    You cannot compare gubernatorial elections to national legislative elections, the first is contested by personalities – party background only plays a minor role here – the latter by political parties and definitely overshadowed by national politics rather than provincial.

    What is interesting is that the radical Islamists are never able to win, even in such a strongly Islamic province like SulSel. Indonesian voters are mature and clever enough to vote for the right people. Only the political elite hasn’t realised it yet and sticks to its old elite power games.

  3. avatar Janma says:

    The third candidate in the November 5th election, Abdul Aziz Kahar Mudzakkar, was supported by the “Koalisi Keumatan dan Kebangsaan” (KKK) and has a reputation as an Islamic militant.

    Unfortunate acronym that…. KKK. Wonder if they’re affiliated?

  4. avatar Anita McKay says:

    Can someone tell me if Abdul Aziz Kahar Mudzakkar has any relationship with Kahar Muzakkar, the famous rebellion leader in South Sulawesi in the 60s ?

  5. avatar Teng says:

    He is the son of former Darul Islam/Tentara Islam Indonesia (DI/TII) military commander Kahar Muzakkar, who led a rebellion against the Indonesian state in the 1950’s.

    It was actually in the article Anita 😉

  6. avatar naga says:

    “Indonesian voters are mature and clever enough to vote for the right people. Only the political elite hasn’t realised it yet and sticks to its old elite power games.”

    well said; again, the Indonesian electorate proves they are smarter than their so-called leaders….

  7. avatar Anita McKay says:

    @Teng: D’oh! I was just reading it at glance so missed the information! Thanks! 🙂

  8. avatar Arema says:

    Unfortunate acronym that”¦. KKK. Wonder if they’re affiliated?

    KKK = Kurang Kerjaan Kabeh 😛

  9. avatar Zaq says:

    I just back from Makassar. While I was there, people I met told me the unethical campaign done by Syahrul Yasin Limpo. Since he was the deputy of Amin Syam, Syahrul criticized Amin Syam administration, while we all know that he was part of it.

    Common character of Indonesian politicians. Sad….

  10. avatar Djoko says:

    Both Islamic militants and Golkar lose in the South Sulawesi election

    I just read that Limpo and his running mate are actually Golkar cadres. If Golkar’s history of backing the wrong horse but still having their cadres win in the end (*cough*2004 presidential election*cough*) is any precedent to go by, for all intents and purposes Golkar DID win.

  11. avatar Anita McKay says:

    Djoko I think you’re right. Limpo’s family has been with Golkar for a long time. If not mistaken his father was in parliament. But he’s been in the politics forever too, he was pak Lurah somewhere in Gowa in the 80s when I still lived Makassar, and even that, since he’s got powerful family, he’s quite famous (compared to other Lurahs, I must say).

    What I don’t understand is Abdul Azis Kahar Muzakkar. As he’s the son of famous rebellion leader, how could he pass fit and proper test?

  12. avatar Zaq says:

    Anita,

    then you follow the ORBA in treating the descendat of the PKI members?

  13. avatar Anita McKay says:

    My history is rusty but as far as I remember, Kahar Muzakkar wasn’t not PKI, he was a rebel who wanted to separate South Sulawesi from Indonesia. I don’t remember that he brought any ideology on his battle.

    That’s different from PKI.

    But again, maybe someone knows better could elaborate here?

  14. avatar Anita McKay says:

    Sorry, a typo. Here’s the correction: As far as I remember, Kahar Muzakkar WASN’T PKI.

  15. avatar Zaq says:

    What I mean is, the ORBA treated the descendants of PKI members as the parents. The children were given a mark on their ID card, they got difficulties in finding a job because they don’t have a letter of non-PKI which should be provided when you apply fo a job. The descendants were as guilty as the PKI during Soeharto era.

    So if you think the son of Kahar Muzakkar is as guilty as his father and should be banned from the election, then it is just like the way ORBA treated the PKI descendant.

  16. avatar Anita McKay says:

    Zaq, it’s not what I think. I never think, let alone say, that AAKM is as guilty as the father. I never think or say he should be banned from the election. You made it all up by yourself.

    Before I left Indonesia there was a big uproar about fit and proper test for all Indonesian government members, from the President to the senior manager of BUMN level (correct me here if I’m wrong). Assuming that the process is still applied, did AAKM pass the test? If yes, how, considering he’s got a ‘black dot’ on his sheet? Would be interesting to know.

    I really try to understand the politic atmosphere in Indonesia, especially in South Sulawesi. I’ve lived there for quite long time, and sorry to say, I know people there are narrow minded and short tempered. The fights between students in Unhas almost every year is one example. I was there when people conducted a big demonstration to reject the new rule of wearing helmet for those who ride motorcycles in the 80’s. I know what siri’ means and I know how that honor concept was used to beat people up or worse, to kill others.

    So to have AAKM arises as one of the potential leaders is such an interesting thing to watch.

  17. avatar Rambutan says:

    Kahar Muzakkar’s son should of course not be banned from being politically active. Neither should the children and grandchildren of former PKI members.
    It is interesting to see, however, that the PKI stigma sticks while the ‘son of a former rebel with Islamist agenda’ doesn’t have to have any problems in this regard.

  18. avatar cokk says:

    What is interesting is that the radical Islamists are never able to win, even in such a strongly Islamic province like SulSel. Indonesian voters are mature and clever enough to vote for the right people.

    @Rambutan: do you wanna say it is mature and clever vote for Limpo? and that Limpo is the right people. Whalaa.., don’t because of you do not like someone (eg this person Abdul Aziz) than you say something that you yourself will regret someday.

    It is interesting to see, however, that the PKI stigma sticks while the ‘son of a former rebel with Islamist agenda’ doesn’t have to have any problems in this regard.

    and this, proove that they are still not too clever

  19. avatar agam says:

    I came across this post. interesting. I live in South Sulawesi for nearly two years, these are my observation:
    – People of South Sulawesi (Bugis, Makassar, and also Toraja and Mandar) are famous for their interest to have social high status. in the past, being a royal family was preferred by lay people. they could get noble status by marrying royal family with huge (I mean very huge) amount of dowries.
    – nowadays, postgraduate education is the key to high social status. Syahrul knows it very much and about less than a week before the election, he passed his viva exam in Hasanuddin University and got his doctorate in Law. therefore, Dr. Syahrul Yasin Limpo, SH, MH, M.Si can get much of the swing voters which previously accounted for about 20%

    So, get your doctorate degree, and run for bupati in South Sulawesi. Or, get a second wife with your doctorate degree.

  20. avatar Anita McKay says:

    @Agam, you forget another very important title: HAJI. If it’s allowed probably they will put how many times they have done it. So it could be like H.H.H.H. Dr. Syahrul Yasin Limpo, SH, MH, M.Si.

    But if a ‘social status’ is important, it doesn’t explain about how AAKM could rise to the occassion 🙂

  21. avatar agam says:

    Yes, haji is another social status… for the elders from rural areas who hold their traditional values, young generations tend to value postgraduate education, instead of traditional social status. Many universities offer Magister Sains degree (M.Si or MSc). They are cheap in terms of money, but (I don’t want to argue with someone from South Sulawesi here) the quality is not as good as UI, UGM or ITB.
    Doctorate degrees are also offered at Hasanuddin University and many people with similar interest with Syahrul, take the opportunity to get their modern social status.
    While there are so much factors that can explain Syahrul’s win and Golkar’s Amin Syam defeat (his running mate: Prof. Dr. Mansyur Ramli, another modern noble man), this can explain Syahrul’s appeal to younger people.

    AAKM case is another example of traditional social status.

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