Transnational Islam

Jul 27th, 2007, in IM Posts, by

Nahdlatul Ulama continues to feel under threat, from politicians, other Muslim groups, and transnational Islamic movements.

Nahdlatul Ulama leader Hasyim Muzadi said on 22nd July that all sections of his organisation, the largest Muslim body in the country, must be on alert against the continual attacks upon it. Speaking to a gathering of 1400 people in Madiun, East Java, he said:

The interference which NU is suffering these days emanates from other Islamic religious groups and from transnational Islamic political forces. If these attempts to interfere in the NU succeed they could break up the organisation or cause conflicts between NU and other groups. All members of the NU must learn about these attempts to disturb NU.

Nahdlatul Ulama Logo
Nahdlatul Ulama logo.

Measures to deal with the attempts to subvert or interfere with NU had to be conducted with a cool head, he said.

Don't be violent in trying to settle arguments with other Islamic groups, groups which regard NU teachings as incorrect.

Many Islamic sects and organisations viewed the teachings of NU as not based on the Islam of prophet Muhammad, perhaps as pagan, he said, and such groups sometimes tried to subvert or "steal" NU mosques and mushollas.

Another source of trouble for the NU was Islamic political parties in Indonesia which used the name of NU in order to win votes, and to further the cause of political Islam in the country. detik

They [politicians] just come to us when they've got a problem, once they've got what they wanted they soon forget about the NU.

On another occasion, July 27th, in Jakarta, Hasyim spoke again of the problem of trans-national Islamic political movements, during a conference called "State and Religion Dialogue".

Hasyim Muzadi
Hasyim Muzadi.

Hasyim said that the efforts of Islamic radical political forces to create a transnational Islamic state, or caliphate, would cause problems for Indonesia in its foreign relations, particularly with its near neighbours, because Islamic radicals in Indonesia often cast their eyes on such countries, presumably Singapore, Thailand, and the Philippines for example, and these countries felt threatened. Indonesia had to control its radical Muslim elements, he said, so neighbouring countries did not feel under threat.

However Hasyim said this did not mean that religion had no role in politics, rather that he hoped a "synergy" between religion and national affairs could be created, so that religious life could flourish, while the state did not feel under attack from religious forces. nu.or.id


13 Comments on “Transnational Islam”

  1. avatar Odinius says:

    The NU is not assertive enough IMO. It is the world’s largest Muslim organization, and it should behave as such. Why should the NU be so passive when others are calling them heretics, pagans, etc.? I don’t mean physically fight, but NU should be out there putting its foot down that other versions of Islam are no more correct or pure than its own.

  2. avatar Abul says:

    I’ve got lots of respect for NU. Theirs is the most friendliest face of Islam that I’ve seen so far, apart from IslamLib. Wish them all the best.

  3. avatar Shiva says:

    Abul Says:

    I’ve got lots of respect for NU. Theirs is the most friendliest face of Islam that I’ve seen so far, apart from IslamLib. Wish them all the best.

    When an organization has the blood of several hundred thousand Indonesians on their hand, they have no respect from me.

    The gestapu and Nahdatul Ulama Run Amok.

  4. avatar Abul says:

    Lol, you’ve got that right shiva, forgot the fact that NU has its share of bloodletting during the sixties.

  5. avatar Odinius says:

    NU today just ain’t the same as it was in 1965-7.

    It supported the jakarta charter then. it ceased to in the 1970s, it supported ABRI then, it ceased to in the 1970s, it wanted sharia law imposed then, it ceased to in the 1970s.

    Doesn’t make what ANSOR did right, but it does point to NU being hardly recognizable from the version during Sukarno’s days.

  6. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:

    Re,

    The NU is not assertive enough IMO. It is the world’s largest Muslim organization, and it should behave as such. Why should the NU be so passive when others are calling them heretics, pagans, etc.? I don’t mean physically fight, but NU should be out there putting its foot down that other versions of Islam are no more correct or pure than its own.

    Just an afterthought,

    I was wrong to hold Sputjam responsible for the tsunami and earthquake. He is after all, a GOOD moslem practising what he preach.

    NU were GOOD moslem when they had blood on their hands, but now become BAD moslem for feeling guilty and apologizing for their pasts. According to a top islamic academic, they are the one responsible for the wrath of Allah on Javanese and Achehnese. Shame on NU. BAD BAD moslem for being passive and tolerant. More tsunami, earthquake and hell fire on the way. Repent now!

  7. avatar Odinius says:

    @aluang, was the syamsuddin that said that? I know he said the tsunami was allah’s wrath at acehnese not being good enough Muslims.

    Jerry falwell said the same thing about hurricane katrina victims not being good enough Christians.

    Amazing!

  8. avatar Djoko says:

    What the NU leadership (Gus Dur and those who are either close to him or otherwise officially sanctioned by him) says and what the NU grassroots (kiai and nahdiyyin on the local level) does are two completely different things. I think you’ll find that the NU grassroots are just as supportive of things like shariah as they ever have been. Even the women’s wing of the NU, Fatayat supported the anti-pornography laws…

    What the NU is worried about though is that some groups (*cough* PKS/tarbiyah *cough*) are tapping into this continuing grassroots level support for shariah and drawing their supporters and mosques away from them. Groups like PKS and Hizbut Tahrir are essentially doing what Muhammadiyah was doing at the start of the 20th Century. Though just like Muhammadiyah these groups in time will likely moderate their stance and newer groups will pop up to replace them again. So continues the circle of Indonesian Islamization which has been going on for the past few centuries, is not complete, and likely never will be.

  9. avatar Raden says:

    Frankly, this is clearly the boring topics for those who are not Muslim. And since the majority of Muslim fellow in Indonesia are moron & low in education, these counter productive specific Islam problems are becoming the National Agenda. Thus become the country-wide burden for our economy & political progression.
    Thus … if you are non Muslims, it is better to leave this moron country, it is not worth of your time to live in Indonesia indeed.

    THOSE WHO ARE THINKING OF MARRYING OR OBTAINING INDONESIAN CITIZEN, BEWARE OF THOSE INDONESIAN MUSLIM ENDEMIC PROBLEMS BEFORE YOU MAKE DECISION TO GET YOUR WORTHLESS GREEN PASSPORT

  10. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:

    Odinius,

    @aluang, was the syamsuddin that said that? I know he said the tsunami was allah’s wrath at acehnese not being good enough Muslims.

    Jerry falwell said the same thing about hurricane katrina victims not being good enough Christians.

    Amazing!

    Nope, Odinius. It was said by top Egyptian Geologist Zaghloul El-Naggar. He is a leading figure in Middle Eastern moslem society, a member of the Geologist Society of London and he publishes internationally.

    What he said recently,

    “We (the Islamic world) are not behind because ofIslam. We are behind because of what the Americans and British have done to us.”
    “The earthquake that trigger the 2005 tsunami and washed away nearly a quarter of a million lives are moral warning from God. Allah had expressed his wrath over the sins of the west.”

    When prompted why had God punished Southeast Asia rather than Los Angeles or the coast of Florida, he said,

    “Because the lands that were hit had tolerate the immoral behaviour of tourists.”

    Based on what this Islamic top academic had said (infact many echoed the same tune); I, bro Cuk and Sputjam have every reason to believe NU members had brought on the calamities. I was in Yogya and Solo last week and could not believe what I have seen – Chinese restaurants selling pork sio may, Muslimahs not wearing jilbab and the Borobudur is still there.

    Amazing!

  11. avatar Tomaculum says:

    Because the lands that were hit had tolerate the immoral behaviour of tourists.

    As far as I know Aceh isn’t a touristic region. So which people should be punished?
    Logically it sohould be Bali, isn’t it? But maybe logically thinking is forbidden in some circles?
    Amazing!!

    Shiva, why do you hate Islam so much?

  12. avatar Ihaknt says:

    Maybe Shiva was Ismail. 😀 hehehehe.

  13. avatar Raden says:

    or maybe Shiva is a Jewish, ha ha

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