Defence Spending

Mar 13th, 2007, in News, by

Indonesian defence spending rises by 15%.

Defence Minister Juwono Sudarsono recently explained to the parliamentary defence commission that the Indonesian military (TNI) will have to prioritize its major tasks as the recent 15% increase in the defense budget would still not provide enough money for its basic requirements. The small defence budget was a chronic problem that had prevented the Defense ministry and the military from improving their performances recently, he said, as quoted by the Jakarta Post.

The small defense budget is really a major obstacle to reaching the three major targets of improving the operational preparedness of all military units, soldiers' social welfare and soldiers' professionalism.

Based on the 2005-2009 strategic state defence development program, the Defense Ministry says it needs 74.4 trillion rupiah ($8 billion) for this fiscal year, but the government has meanly allocated only 32.6 trillion, although this represented an increase of 15.6% on the 2006 defense budget of 28.2 trillion.

The defense budget is only 44% of what is required, 4.2% of the 2007 state budget, or 0.92% of the gross national product.

Sudarsono said, adding a greater part of the budget would be spent on paying wages to soldiers and staff.

Juwono said the Defense Ministry and TNI gave priority to software design and weapons' technology research. Old equipment had to be maintained and new weapons procured. Social welfare programs for soldiers were also a focus.

Mi 35
Mi 35.

TNI chief Air Chief Marshal Djoko Suyanto said the armed forces' arsenal was mostly past its use by date, and this had prompted the government to procure weaponry through export credit schemes.

Over the next two years, the TNI will give priority to procuring corvettes, Russian-made Sukhoi jet fighters and Mi-17 and Mi-35 attack helicopters, and two unmanned aerial vehicles to help provide a minimum of protection for Indonesian territory.

We will also focus on enhancing security on the outer islands this fiscal year.


13 Comments on “Defence Spending”

  1. avatar Ihaknt says:

    Mmm, let’s hope the corruption is not up by 20% otherwise this department will be running on a negative margin.

  2. avatar Dimp says:

    15% is to adjust for the corruption.

  3. avatar Chris says:

    If Indonesian defence forces are looking to save money, why don’t they reduce some of their operations in Papua? They are doing a lot more harm (e.g. human rights abuses, creating man-made famines, passing on AIDS, etc.) than good there anyway.

  4. avatar Mohammed Khafi says:

    TNI chief Air Chief Marshal Djoko Suyanto Said:

    We will also focus on enhancing security on the outer islands this fiscal year.

    Perhaps he reads Indonesia Matters? 🙂

    Peace

  5. avatar Robert says:

    therighteousdude,

    I think the TNI will be very reluctant to reduce their operation in Papua, The cooperation with Freeport is a very profitable one. I don’t know how much Freeport is paying them, but it will be profitable enough for the TNI to keep their operation running there.

    Mohammed Khafi,

    Maybe this was the first time that Air Chief Suyanto saw a map of Indonesia with it’s airforce bases? So it was a good thing that the map was published on IM, so finally the outer islands get some protection!

  6. avatar 1ndra says:

    The western islands’ defence are holding. :lol

    Well, the tni should buy more ships/aircraft to protect Indonesia from infiltrators and destructors, like illegal fishing, illegal logging, and illegal tresspasing like what Malaysia did.

  7. […] Matters has a post on Indonesia’s Defense Minister explaining why they need to raise the defense budget by 15%. Preetam […]

  8. avatar Riccardo says:

    The small defense budget is really a major obstacle to reaching the three major targets of improving the operational preparedness of all military units, soldiers’ social welfare and soldiers’ professionalism.

    Why should it cost more money to improve “soldier’s professionalism”?

    Sounds like typical mafia extortion tactics, something like: ‘Our soldiers will remain rights abusers and remain involved in human trafficking, illegal logging, casinos and drugs UNLESS you give us more money.’

    Does it really cost so much money to tell the soldiers, “No you are not allowed to break the laws of NKRI”? Does it really cost so much money to throw them in the BRIG if they do violate the military code of ethics or the laws of RI?

  9. avatar Bas says:

    That TNI thing is just a big joke and total wasting of money. Give the money to the education not to those useless “soldiers”.

  10. avatar Hassan says:

    I seriously doubt the 15% raise will result in tangible improvement within the TNI. It will not translate into reliable modern weapon systems or a sustainable welfare for the average soldier. The money will most likely be used to pay the extravagant markups whenever the TNI procure anything and to increase the wages of the colonels, generals and joint chief-of-staffs.

    “Sudarsono said, adding a greater part of the budget would be spent on paying wages to soldiers and staff.”

    I had a feeling they will prioritize the staffs’ wages (high ranking officers) first, then the leftovers can be given to the soldiers. Poor guys.

  11. avatar 1ndra says:

    Just watch the news, Indonesia is really being bugged by illegal sand export.

    And if it doesn’t stop in the right time and reconstruct, Riau will be in great disaster.

  12. avatar Hassan says:

    1ndra: “And if it doesn’t stop in the right time and reconstruct, Riau will be in great disaster.”

    Of course. But what can we do if members of the TNI themselves gave the backing on such operations? In years to come we must expect to lose some of the islands there due to abrasion and excessive sand mining, submerged under the sea.

  13. avatar 1ndra says:

    Then those people are subject to be drowned too. 😉

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