Causes of Disunity

Feb 6th, 2009, in News, by

Another East Timor in Papua, lack of development in the province, and racism by other Indonesians towards Papuans.

East Timor Analogy

In January of 2009 an association of Christian churches in Papua, the Persekutuan Gereja-Gereja Baptis (PGBP), sent a letter to President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono complaining about the selection procedure for new employees (CPNS) of the Department of Religion (Depag) in areas such as Keerom, Tolikara, Sarmi, Jayapura and Pegunungan Bintang.

The PGBP appears to believe that Depag takes a disproportionate number of new civil servants who are not native Papuans and not Christian. A spokesman for PGBP said

The Papuan Baptist Church asks that Depag be very careful in maintaining good inter-religious relations because the issue of religion is highly sensitive in Papua.

He believed that there had been some deliberate manipulation of the final intake for new public servants that disadvantaged native Papuans, and that this was in violation of the 2001 Special Papuan Autonomy Act which specified that native people should receive preference in hiring decisions.

PGBP Logo

The spokesman added that the Department of Religion should not repeat the mistakes it had made in East Timor from 1976-99, which had alienated native East Timorese religious leaders, and helped cause that province to break-away from Indonesia, or else something similar might occur in Papua. antara

Aceh & PNG Analogies

Late in 2008 Frederika Korayn from a Papuan womens' group asked a seminar in Jakarta

The government is willing to have dialogue with the people of Aceh, why not in Papua?

She went on to complain that since integration with Indonesia conditions had not improved much, with still 80% of Papuan women being in absolute poverty, largely un-educated and with poor health.

The Autonomy Act had been implemented only in limited cases and was largely of no value, and she said that population growth in the province was worryingly slow, that since 1970 the population had only grown by 1.5%, whereas in neighbouring Papua New Guinea growth had been at 10%.

The 'Other'

At the same seminar Yenny Rosa Damayanti of the Association of Indonesian Legal and Human Rights Aid (PBHI), a non-Papuan, said that Indonesians often regarded Papuans as "the other(s)" because of their different skin complexion and race.

Because of the skin colour and hair we regard them as "the other", not as brothers.

People needed to think about what constituted an Indonesian and whether the definition included Papuans, she said: tempo

Is it just Malay people? Is it just Muslims?


258 Comments on “Causes of Disunity”

  1. avatar obaka says:

    “He believed that there had been some deliberate manipulation of the final intake for new public servants that disadvantaged native Papuans…..”

    o please just accept reality that native papuans weren’t smart enough to pass the test to be a civil servant (a friend of mine called them ‘idiot’ and yes you can blame anything or anyone for that condition)….katanya dulu minta kesetaraan hak sekarang minta diistimewakan..capek deh

  2. avatar DXP says:

    I am DXP, a CHINA man who is outsider of Indonesian is trying to look at from International perspectives to comment this posting.
    1. In the world, there are only 2 countries with MALAY race as the majority citizen, they are Malaysia and Indonesia, both have very similar race, religion & attitude toward minority (regardless the minority races).
    2. Only fraction of Suriname population from the Malay/Javanese race as minority of Surinamese, however to be excluded in this topic as one of a kind because they are in minority position
    3. While Malaysia is in more extreem oppressive attitude toward the minority (currently the Malaysian majority demand the exclusivity of ‘Allah’ word belong to Muslim community hence the Christian are forced to edit & remove Allah to God in their Bible), while both of Malaysia & Indonesia equally implemented certain oppressive attitude, double standard among races, are a common fact/attribute in both countries.

  3. avatar diego says:

    Why is it too predictable? *Yawn* I knew, just by looking at the title of the thread, the likes of dragie, dxp, wandi will flock in. Yes, right dxp, (indo)chinese people are flawless. They hold up this high morality standard. They’re all loving people. Very sensitive to others. *Yawn*.

    To fellow indonesians (truly indonesians, not the ones brainwashed by semitic mumbo-jumbos), let’s open ourselves to constructive self-criticism. Sometimes I wonder if we are racist or simply ignorant. Once I saw in a blog a teenager commented about papuan girl, maybe referring to the skin color / facial features. I forgot the detail, it’s kind of light-hearted teenager-style comment, but I got the impression that he thinks less of papuans (at least for the physical features). Are we racist toward people we consider “inferior” (just because they have darker skin color)? Or are we just ignorant, in a similar situation like many people who inhabit zhongguo… (I’m trying to avoid the word “chinese” here, for fear of offending some very sensitive weenies). Please watch this video to see what I mean: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTHLHGSAGpY . The black girl puts it very well and nicely.

  4. avatar Burung Koel says:

    The Autonomy Act had been implemented only in limited cases and was largely of no value, and she said that population growth in the province was worryingly slow, that since 1970 the population had only grown by 1.5%, whereas in neighbouring Papua New Guinea growth had been at 10%.

    There’s probably an argument or discussion in there about how effective devolusi has been in terms of changing the civil service from it’s former centralised and dirigiste approach. The selection of new civil servants no doubt reflects this, as do the more important issues of service delivery. Then link that to how effective the DPRD is at articulating and represnting the needs of all groups in society. In the end, civil servants have to implement the policies of elected officials.

    BTW: I assume that’s population growth per annum. PNG at 10 per cent? Really? I know from personal experience that there have been problems with accurate counting in the various censuses in PNG, but that quoted figure may need checking.

  5. avatar Oigal says:

    o please just accept reality that native papuans weren’t smart enough to pass the test to be a civil servant (a friend of mine called them ‘idiot’

    Oh beautiful, straight out out the colonial handbook 101..”I say ol chap..nice enough fellows these wogs but not smart enought to ever amount to anything in a civilised society wot!).

    Perhaps the the reason they are not smart enough is the absolute disgrace in the provision of schooling in the provinces (and a lot of the others).

    The endless rants about the evil colonials stealing the riches of Indonesia is apt but also ironic considering present attitude so prevelant in Indonesia. Papua alone contributies 3% of the entire nations GBP yet people like Obaka have the nerve to comment on the smarts of the Papuans whilst living on the fruits of that and other provinces.

    Here’s quick test..Papua contributes 3% of the yearly GBP for Indonesia but can name three schools of international standard in the province…ok…one…ok one papuan school in the top 100 in Indonesia…Yea nuff said

    Well past time the powers that be in Jakarta and Java (perhaps the people who reside there) acknowledge that the only reason they exist as a nation is via the contribution of the outer provinces to the economy and stop treating them as second class citizens.

    Is it possible to learn from history and build a nation without one particular group acting like a greedy colonial power, one would hope so ..but it appears not and that road only leads to one place as history has shown time and again.

  6. avatar Arie Brand says:

    Oigal wrote:

    “The endless rants about the evil colonials stealing the riches of Indonesia is apt but also ironic considering present attitude so prevelant in Indonesia. Papua alone contributies 3% of the entire nations GBP yet people like Obaka have the nerve to comment on the smarts of the Papuans whilst living on the fruits of that and other provinces.”

    Please see for this my:

    http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=blog/417

    I reproduce here the first part of that series of twelve articles.

    Papuan self-determination – historical roots I

    Arie Brand was born in Holland and was in West Papua when the country was turned over to the Indonesians in 1962. I hope that this is the first of many articles about that part of the World.

    Thank you Arie for this beginning. Hamish Alcorn.

    ——————————————————————————–

    by Arie Brand

    Dr George Aditjondro’s critical introduction to P Schoorl (ed), Belanda di Irian Jaya : amtenar di masa penuh gejolak (Holland in Irian Jaya – Civil servant in troubled times, 1945-1962 – the Indonesian translation of an original Dutch work to which I contributed a chapter) provides me here with a convenient point of departure.

    Aditjondro argues that the Dutch motivation for hanging on to the territory and excluding it from the transfer of sovereignty in 1949 had to do with Holland’s economic and strategic interests, plus the desire to create a homeland for Dutch Eurasians. He sees Dutch insistence on Papuan self-determination as no more than a last minute ploy designed to keep Indonesia out of the region.

    I will argue that these notions are almost entirely wrong and that, contrary to what Aditjondro seems to believe, emotional factors have played a far greater role than economic and ‘strategic’ calculations in the Dutch decision to exclude Papua from the transfer of sovereignty.

    I will, finally, contend that the idea of self-determination played from the start of negotiations about independence an important role in Dutch ideas about the future of an independent Indonesia. The Dutch envisaged a federal structure for Indonesia and believed that the various territories should have the right to join or not join this federal structure (external self-determination) or to join it as a separate state rather than as part of the ‘core’state in Java and Sumatra (internal self-determination). However, the population of Papua was deemed unable as yet to exercise this right. So, ironically, when the federal structure was speedily demolished by Jakarta within about half a year after it had consented to it, this territory was the only one to retain a concrete right to self-determination albeit a postponed right.

    Economically “worthless”

    I will first discuss here whether Holland was swayed by economic considerations in its decision to exclude Papua from the transfer of sovereignty.

    It is well known that presently the region with its rich mineral resources is one of the most important income spinners for the Indonesian government (and the Indonesian army). That was entirely different in Dutch times. The scanty knowledge about mineral resources then encouraged virtually no one to invest in a region the future of which was so uncertain.

    There was some exploitation of oil but that was entirely insignificant. In its top year (1954) the exploration company concerned, the Nederlands Nieuw Guinea Petroleum Maatschappij produced 500,000 tons (Van ‘t Veer (1960), Nieuw Guinea tegen wil en dank, Querido, Amsterdam – New Guinea, whether we want it or not). At first sight this seems very impressive but by world standards it was really a pitiful amount. If we convert those 500,000 by the factor 7 to 3,500,000 barrels we can have a look at international comparisons. Australia, which is not exactly known as an oil rich country, produces, according to figures given in the US Geological Survey and Oil and Gas Journal, something like 190 million barrels a year, or, in other words, about sixty times as much (this figure dates from a few years back). And for an even more amazing figure: Holland has hardly any oil at all yet, in that same top year, it produced twice as much oil as the NNGPM did in West Papua (Van ‘t Veer, 1960: p35). And yet, even this minimal production went in the ensuing years down to about half that amount and in 1960 the company handed its concessions back – only in the “Bird’s Head’ could production be continued for a few more years until that field too was exhausted. All in all the whole enterprise was a failure. According to Van ‘t Veer the company invested since 1935 400 million guilders and gained in total, until 1960, 120 million (1960: p.36). It is true that there were some powerful companies behind this enterprise (Shell and Standard Oil) but these wouldn’t have worried much about an entirely negligible part of their activities.

    Seeing the lack of any large scale gainful economic activity in the area then it is no wonder that its most effective Dutch governor, Dr Jan van Baal (later professor of anthropology at the University of Utrecht), conceived of the economic future of the territory mainly in terms of small scale indigenous agriculture.

    Dutch entrepreneurs – The Bilderberg group

    Dutch industrial groups were hardly more sanguine.

    One of the most important Anglo-Dutch enterprises in Holland was and is Unilever. The man who was the Dutch President-Director of this firm in the fifties, Mr P Rijkens, lobbied furiously for handing over West Papua to Indonesia, for the obvious reason that business possibilities in Indonesia seemed then infinitely larger than those in West Papua. Rijkens was very well connected. He was an important figure in the Bilderberg Group, a well-known group of leading figures in the international financial and political world, that had originally been brought together by the Dutch Prince-Consort, the late Prince Bernhard and met on an annual basis (and is, it seems, still doing so). Apparently this group as a whole was interested in the speedy transfer of the region to Indonesia. Prince Bernhard, transgressing his constitutional position in the process, worked for it behind the scenes. He fully shared the views of Rijkens and Konijnenburg (president-director of KLM) in this matter.

    The position of the Bilderberg group was so clear on this point that it was joined for a while by an outsider with a similar interest, the Dutch maverick-journalist Willem Oltmans, who prided himself on being a personal friend of the fanatical activist for an Indonesian Papua, President Sukarno (he published a book with the title My friend Sukarno in which the man is apparently depicted as a latter day saint). Oltmans claims (he can be checked out on the internet) that he left this group when he found out that a Dutch CIA-agent was a member of it.

    The historian Arjen Taselaar, in his study of the activities of the Dutch economic colonial lobby, sees in the very fact that it didn’t get its way as far as the transfer of West Papua was concerned, clear evidence for the decline of its political clout. He wrote:

    In the Netherlands in the same period the relation between the Association of Entrepreneurs (Ondernemersraad) and the Government worsened because of the New Guinea policy. New Guinea was still economically as worthless as it was before the Second World War but the stubbornness with which the Netherlands held on to the island now threatened the interests of Dutch entrepreneurs in Indonesia… The Dutch government knew of course that the entrepreneurs didn’t agree with its New Guinea policy but it took that for granted. The group Rijkens (named after the President-Director of Unilever, P Rijkens), of which Van Oldenborgh and some other members of the executive of the Association of Entrepreneurs were members, was equally not able to make the Minister of Foreign Affairs, JMAH Luns, and some other members of the cabinet change their minds (Taselaar (1998), De Nederlandse koloniale lobby – Ondernemers en de Indische Politiek, Leiden – The Dutch colonial lobby – Entrepreneurs and policy on the Indies; the translation of the quote is mine, AB).

  7. avatar Burung Koel says:

    Papuans may not be able to get jobs as civil servants, but they are certainly over-represented in the national football team. There were at least four Indonesians of Papuan origin up against the Ausralians a couple of weeks ago.

    Merit based selection is obviously more important if you want to win a football match, compared to making policy and delivering services. So, the level playing field is a… level playing field, apparently.

  8. avatar obaka says:

    “Papua alone contributies 3% of the entire nations GBP yet people like Obaka have the nerve to comment on the smarts of the Papuans whilst living on the fruits of that and other provinces”

    yeah let us ask betawi peoples whose land contribute 16% of GDP(+90% indonesian money circulation) do they ever ask for priority to be a civil servant?how many jakarta’s governor came from betawi descendant ?(just compare with papua province)

    sorry for my harsh comment what i mean is if papuan people want to be more
    prosper work harder & diminish corruption among local authorities. If papuan peoples want to be a civil servant just study and study coz the standard passing grade is relatively same in all other province (dont be spoiled) or follow example from our ex-president Suharto just do nepotism…and there are many job which required less ‘brain’ with equal respect and MORE money like football player……

  9. avatar Lairedion says:

    My Manadonese paternal grandfather was mocked by his relatives because he married a Javanese woman as Muslim Javanese were considered the “pembantu” people. So racism and ignorance also exist between the Melayu.

    This racism towards black people is a worldwide phenomenon. You see it in the Americas, Europe, Northern Africa, Asia, Australia. Still wonder what black people have done to cause so much hatred among non-blacks? Personally I think Papuans are very nice and friendly people. Their culture is so much different than Melayu and, as such, they should be left alone to handle their own affairs.

    obaka, do you need to study to become a public servant? Let me guess, stealing money, sembahyang and nongkrong?

  10. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:

    @ DXP

    ni hao.

    You are not a well read Chinese. Here is a list of your mistakes:

    1. In the world, there are only 2 countries with MALAY race as the majority citizen, they are Malaysia and Indonesia, both have very similar race, religion & attitude toward minority (regardless the minority races).

    The major Malay race are the Fillipinoes, the Melayus and the Javanese. Melayus are majority in Brunei and Malaysia. In Indonesia, the Javanese.

    2. Only fraction of Suriname population from the Malay/Javanese race as minority of Surinamese, however to be excluded in this topic as one of a kind because they are in minority position

    wo bu min bai. Sorry can’t make out what you say. Is this chinglish?

    3. While Malaysia is in more extreem oppressive attitude toward the minority (currently the Malaysian majority demand the exclusivity of ‘Allah’ word belong to Muslim community hence the Christian are forced to edit & remove Allah to God in their Bible), while both of Malaysia & Indonesia equally implemented certain oppressive attitude, double standard among races, are a common fact/attribute in both countries.

    wo ai ni. Javanese loves their chung guo ren. It is their attitude and actions that stink. If we have treated them like what the Melayus did to their chinese population, you wouldn’t be so lucky as to raise your voice. Chinese in Melayu land idolised their malai ren. Why? Because the chinese are made to beg for their rights. A former British high commissioner who was a family friend once told my dad that ‘this is extreme racism’ in ref to the large stateless chinese population in one of the Melayu land.

    All mata sepet are green card holders (stateless). On special occassion, a few mata sepet families will be chosen and granted red id card (still stateless but allowed to work). I have few friends who had tear and joy on being granted red card. And these red card is conditional, the moment you forget to renew it, it is back to green card. When I think of Javanese Indonesia, we treated our chinese population reasonably well. We raise little brats who now foul mouthed the Javanese from overseas. The wind through the vines told me that Dragonball wrote to Irene to bag us anonymously which was why she immediately removed her link, and photos.

  11. avatar sputjam says:

    whites look down on the chinese, who looks down on the malays, who looks down on the papuans.
    Ever thought the papuans did not know they have to bribe to get government jobs? Native indons just live with it. Unless of course, if you happens to have connections inside. So the elites get the job for free, while the peasants have to pay.
    papuans may score badly in tests, but then javanese will probably score just as bad if they had set for a test written by papuans.
    Lennox Lewis (One time boxing heavyweight champion) and Obama’s step brother, both black, have chinese wives.
    Racism depends on the individual. If he was brought up right, then he should be alright.
    Muslim religious schools in south east asia have the tendency to teach their students that only muslims are upright, and this may be the cause of hatred/misunderstanding against the non-moslem minorities.

  12. avatar sputjam says:

    One more thing, unilever, the company is not dutch anymore. Last ie heard, it is now owned by Malaysian group IOI.

  13. avatar Arie Brand says:

    It was in fact never fully Dutch because it was originally a merger between the British Lever Brothers and the Dutch “Margarine Unie”.

    Now however it is fully international with branches all over the world – but apparently not in Malaysia. Where did you get that information that it is owned by that Malaysian group?

    As to the intelligence of Papuans: in the Dutch era I have spent years among them and not just in towns but also in jungle villages, being a patrolling officer of the ‘pamong pradja” (B.B.). My impression was always that on average they are highly intelligent though often uneducated of course.

    I have on occasion even inquired about the topic of conversation between two very intelligent looking individuals who were discoursing in their native language. It was invariably about pedestrian things, such as the fish catch of that day etc. Yes, of course, what else would it be about. Their world was then very limited. But the obvious intelligence of their looks and tone made me, wrongly, expect a somewhat more sophisticated discourse.

    The wellknown biologist/geographer Jareth Diamond, who has also spent long periods among them on the Eastern side , even came up with the view that on average they are more intelligent than westerners because the test set by human evolution, “the survival of the fittest”, has been so much harder for them. In other words: the Papuan survivors were fitter, also in terms of intelligence, than is the case with populations in which the unfit have had the chance to survive thanks to medical care etc.

    I think this is somewhat of an extreme view, for one thing because effective medical care in the West is only relatively recent.

    Whatever the case may be: the Indonesians have treated them badly and certainly not as the ‘long lost brothers’ they were going to liberate from ‘colonial slavery’.

  14. avatar Aluang Anak Bayang says:

    @ Arie Brand

    But the obvious intelligence of their looks and tone made me, wrongly, expect a somewhat more sophisticated discourse.

    Maybe they are discussing what meal to make of you, a bule.

    Whatever the case may be: the Indonesians have treated them badly and certainly not as the ‘long lost brothers’ they were going to liberate from ‘colonial slavery’.

    The Javanese forcefully stop them from eating each other. This ‘highly intelligent’ Papuans practised cannabalism, you know?

  15. avatar obaka says:

    “obaka, do you need to study to become a public servant? Let me guess, stealing money, sembahyang and nongkrong?”

    i AM a civil servant and if you want to know how hard it was to pass the test just ask my 50.000+ competitors for this kind of job (i’m a tax officer working for ministry of finance) or why not you try it by yourself….

  16. avatar Arie Brand says:

    “The Javanese forcefully stop them from eating each other. This ‘highly intelligent’ Papuans practised cannabalism (sic), you know?”

    This is exactly the disdainful attitude that has bedevilled the relations between Indonesians and Papuans. A sort of “provincial cultural arrogance”. In fact you people had and have a far more racist attitude towards them than the ‘totok’ Dutch ever had.

    You are, moreover, badly informed. Some fifty years ago, when I was a young man there, cannibalism was already extremely rare. It was only to be found in some isolated pockets west of Merauke – among the Marind Anim. In the residency I served, Fak Fak, there was no trace of it and I doubt whether it has ever been prevalent there.

    In the epilogue to my series on Papua of which you can find the website address in one of my previous posts I wrote on this:

    “Benedict Anderson wrote once that the ‘subsequent painful relations between the populations of West New Guinea and the emissaries of the independent Indonesian state can be attributed to the fact that Indonesians more or less sincerely regard these populations as ‘brothers and sisters’ while the populations themselves, for the most part, see things very differently’.

    I believe that this statement can only be accepted if it is heavily qualified. The ‘brothers and sisters’ theme remained alive as long as West Papua was only a fiction in the prolonged ‘revolutionary struggle’ in the Sukarno-era against the Dutch, it was very soon dropped by the Indonesians who actually came to occupy the area and after that it had only a precarious existence in the officially sanctioned myth about the ‘liberation’ of the territory.

    It is possible that the obvious disinclination of many Papuans to see the occupying force of Indonesians as ‘brothers’ that had come to liberate them has ultimately contributed somewhat to a similar lack of brotherly enthusiasm on the side of the Indonesians – though I believe that a sort of provincial cultural arrogance about their assumed superiority above all these ‘naked people’, mixed with the callousness that comes from greed, had far more to do with this.”

  17. avatar Lairedion says:

    No obaka, I have a natural dislike for “pegawai negeri”, lazy people squandering tax payer’s money. I would be ashamed of myself if I should pass a test to become a public servant.

  18. avatar PrimaryDrive says:

    It seems to me, that separating from Indonesia, if this can be done peacefully, will offer the brigthest future for Papuan people. They have a very rich land. The papuans have shown enough loyalty by sticking to the corrupt and incapable central politics in Jakarta. They rightly pointed out that the old Republic has brought little progress to Papua. I would’t blame them if they now want to try it on their own.

  19. avatar dragonwall says:

    To fellow indonesians (truly indonesians, not the ones brainwashed by semitic mumbo-jumbos), let’s open ourselves to constructive self-criticism. Sometimes I wonder if we are racist or simply ignorant

    Your forever ranting here is as ambiguous as you are yourself. You claim not to be racist but yet you were sarcarstic in making remarks even to your fellow Indonesians. So does that proves that you are racist?

    The endless rants about the evil colonials stealing the riches of Indonesia considering present attitude so prevelant in Indonesia

    I really don’t think this will end as long as the local Indonesians are still living in such prevailing poverty.

    wo ai ni. Javanese loves their chung guo ren.

    See the empathy of the words used shows the false pretence in you

    It is their attitude and actions that stink. If we have treated them like what the Melayus did to their chinese population, you wouldn’t be so lucky as to raise your voice.

    If their attitude stinks, then what about yours? Oh really! Want to take into comparison the Melayus in Malaysia and the Melayus in Singapore before you talk. So you are lucky and the Chinese were not.

    Chinese in Melayu land idolised their malai ren. Why? Because the chinese are made to beg for their rights.

    When a person is born in that country, then it becomes their right and nothing to beg about. Anything besides that is simply discrimination. Pathetic people like you will always try to pretend with such hypocrisy by making such claims.

    A former British high commissioner who was a family friend once told my dad that ‘this is extreme racism’ in ref to the large stateless chinese population in one of the Melayu land.

    I think your family have been licking the spittles of them and it is because of what he told your dad no wonder you hated the Brits and Aussies.

    All mata sepet are green card holders (stateless). On special occassion, a few mata sepet families will be chosen and granted red id card (still stateless but allowed to work)

    You mean which country?. So what about all those Melayus that were granted the same in other countries? Are they also stateless?

    I have few friends who had tear and joy on being granted red card. And these red card is conditional, the moment you forget to renew it, it is back to green card.

    This is something new when you refer to green card, so tell me were you the one or your friends that set the rules and regulations governing the what your so call red card and green card in the US. What is a red card and what is a green card?

    When I think of Javanese Indonesia, we treated our chinese population reasonably well.

    During the Soeharto era perhaps. Before his impeachment the first person to demonstrate the evil feeling conceive in him was Aburizal Bakrie and after Soeharto’s impeachment the first person to do the same was Blow Job Habibie. So come kiss my arse and f*ck off if you do not know what you are talking about.

    We raise little brats who now foul mouthed the Javanese from overseas.

    Care to elaborate whom did you raise? And one thing about Javanese like you needs to be foul bouth because of your f**k**g unbecoming sarcarstic remarks embedded in what you always claimed to be a Superior Javanese in your remarks and comments, but still dare not admit that you have Chinese blood flowing in you. So what do you make of this. Does that makes you a traitor, a coward that I always refer about you?

    The wind through the vines told me that Dragonball wrote to Irene to bag us anonymously which was why she immediately removed her link, and photos.

    Everyone has their right to do what they want as long as it is to protect their personal interest and let me tell you that there were many out here in these blogs and those in the international community might be on verge of having you bagged in a plastic bag.

    So don’t bother to wait too long because hell won’t wait.

  20. avatar dragonwall says:

    One more thing forgot to add.

    This is what it takes for Causing the Disunity.

  21. avatar diego says:

    Ni hao dragie,

    Ni zenmeyang? Haojiubujian. Ni zai mang shenme? Trolling around? Oozing some stinky gook of hatred out of your system? *Saddened*.

    As a… ni de laopengyou, let me tell you something. This might hurt you, but you will thank me in the future; that’s what friends are for. Here it is: you’re full of shit.

    To fellow indonesians (truly indonesians, not the ones brainwashed by semitic mumbo-jumbos), let’s open ourselves to constructive self-criticism. Sometimes I wonder if we are racist or simply ignorant

    Your forever ranting here is as ambiguous as you are yourself. You claim not to be racist but yet you were sarcarstic in making remarks even to your fellow Indonesians. So does that proves that you are racist?

    We learn new thing each day, amazing isn’t it? Today, from your comment, I learn new thing: apart from the color of our skin and the shape of our eyes, we have another big difference: we have the willingness and courage to do some self-criticism, and you apparently don’t.

    My comment was directed at my fellow indonesians, an invitation to evaluate the way we see our fellow indonesians, the darker-skinned ones from papua. We might be a bit racist (toward them) at the moment, but we aim to fix that.

    How about you?

    Cya.

  22. avatar dragonwall says:

    This might hurt you, but you will thank me in the future; that’s what friends are for. Here it is: you’re full of shit.

    One thing to me. Hard word breaks no bone. And with friends like you there is no enemy and belief me this is the kind of shit you have. Like

    We learn new thing each day, amazing isn’t it? Today, from your comment, I learn new thing: apart from the color of our skin and the shape of our eyes, we have another big difference: we have the willingness and courage to do some self-criticism,

    This is what I do before making any comment and you apparently don’t but just jumping into conclusions.

    My comment was directed at my fellow indonesians, an invitation to evaluate the way we see our fellow indonesians, the darker-skinned ones from papua. We might be a bit racist (toward them) at the moment,

    Yes I read that well and know what you are referring. But what you failed to understand well is that fake Latinos like you were just waiting for the right moment to splash gasoline onto fire. Try loking at some of your own remarks and the ambiguity it possess.

    but we aim to fix that.

    If you had then you won’t be talking nonsenss here but step onto Papua and tell them what to do and if you can’t then this is also the Cause of Disunity.

    How about you

    I woke up fine but you just drop off the wrong side of your bed.

  23. avatar diego says:

    but we aim to fix that.

    If you had then you won’t be talking nonsenss here but step onto Papua and tell them what to do and if you can’t then this is also the Cause of Disunity.

    I said “we” (referring to the brown man, javanese, balinese, sumatranese, etc).
    Then you said: tell them (the papuans) what to do?

    _We_ are trying to fix our own faults, and for that we’re telling _them_ what to do? Wow….
    Now tell me, what should _we_ (the brown men) tell _them_? Is this your idea?: “hey black papuans, use skin whiteners, so that you’ll be one of us, we wouldn’t think less of you anymore, and racism will be over. Our problem solved.”

    Dragie, please stop the jokes. It’s too absurd.

  24. avatar dragonwall says:

    So it is beginning to get into your senses?

    Nah…ini dia…Now you know what you do not know what you are talking right about, right?. This blog is referring to Papuans and yet you said

    “we” (referring to the brown man, javanese, balinese, sumatranese, etc).

    and

    We_ are trying to fix our own faults,

    So it’s simple, just tell them what is your fault and go on from there. You won’t have the balls because the Javanese were slaughtering the Papuans. You know who I am referring, right?

    and racism will be over. Our problem solved.”

    Are you able to? Try make a blackened linen white, thenwe all know you knew what to do.

  25. avatar Lairedion says:

    I agree with Primary Drive here…

  26. avatar diego says:

    You contradict yourself (again) dragie. I don’t know if it’s because of your poor english or simply because you’re 90% mierda.

    You said: “tell _them_ what to _do_”.
    Now you changed it to: “tell _them_ what is _our_ fault”.

    Why do you have to display your un-trustworthiness like this dragie? Can’t you contain them inside your cuerpito?

  27. avatar dragonwall says:

    Sorry one more thing.

    Tell the Indonesian Chinese that what you did was right or wrong instead of denying it and then you can continue from there.

    These is all about hatred and Discrimination and depriving someone of their rightful rights. How people claimed to be Superior Javanese doing things as though everyone deserves the shit from them. Missing files, killing witness and so on.

    Know what I am talking? You fake Indonesian Latinos….

  28. avatar diego says:

    Tell the indonesians whether what (some of) you did (hiding the stocks, etc.) was right or wrong instead of denying it, and then we can continue from there.

    How about that for the blame game?

  29. avatar dragonwall says:

    Make your own judgement. Use your sense.

    First what happened to Papuans? Why are protesting? The imminence of a separation?

    All why??????????

    Because the Indonesians have done them injustice, right? Does the Indonesian government have the balls to do so? Are they prepare to let them separate? Has there been an ethnic cleansing? If so then why? there must be a reason.

    So who is contradictory.

    TEDUNG.

  30. avatar diego says:

    dragie,

    You are the one who started it by bringing in this tired rant “indonesians admit your faults to chinese or else” (on a thread about papuans), and then when you’re confronted by “please admit some indn-chinese’s fault to indonesians” statement, as always, you try to avoid. Who thought you to be such a prick? I have to admit he/she did a very good job, ta zuo de hen hao!

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