Foreign Radio & Television

Jan 26th, 2007, in News, by

Foreign radio and television broadcasts should be censored, say some leaders.

Joko Susilo, a member of the Information Commission of the Indonesian parliament from the National Mandate Party (Partai Amanat Nasional (PAN)) from East Java, says that relayed foreign broadcasts, whether radio or television, such as Voice of America (VOA), have to be stopped immediately.

Joko Susilo
Joko Susilo.

Sofyan Djalil, the minister for Communications and Information, said he couldn't solve the "problem" because the Indonesian Broadcasting Commission (Komisi Penyiaran Indonesia (KPI)) was obstinate in not doing what the regulations required.

Sofyan Djalil
Sofyan Djalil.

Sofyan however vowed that in future the government would tackle the issue and make sure that foreign broadcasts were delayed, so that they could be censored. tempo


43 Comments on “Foreign Radio & Television”

  1. avatar Sayid says:

    Banning or censoring foreign news and educational media makes it easier for the Indonesian government to lie to its people.

    Foreign news/educational media can help bring about accountability.

    Having a wide variety of information sources available, makes it easier for people to distinguish between facts and opinions; or even truth and lies.

    If the Indonesian government has done something wrong, they are likely to prevent the media from reporting it. Banning/censoring foreign news/educational media is done for the government, not for the people.

    Even in the education system, students are lied to. An example of this is how they teach students about the history of West Papua..

    West Papua was not part of the Majapahit Empire.

    The Majapahit Empire under the King Hayam Wuruk (or Rajasanagara) existed between 1293 and 1520. Its centre was in East Java, and it included two thirds of Java Island, a small part of South Borneo, some of South Celebes, the Western Lesser Sundas, and the Eastern Lesser Sundas to Central Moluccas. The Majapahit Empire did not include Madagascar in West Africa and the Pas archipelago off the coast of Chili – a claim made in all Indonesian documents, including school curriculum texts.

    There is also no evidence that the King of Majapahit conquered territory in West Papua. Even if he had, it doesn’t justify the Indonesian military’s brutal occupation of West Papua.

  2. avatar Naga says:

    The scary censorship going on right now is from Deplu, BIN and the TNI. There’s an inter-departmental committee that meets once a month to review journalist’s visa applications. They hardly ever issue short-term visas anymore. That drastically limits the amount of foreign journalists who can come in.

    This has been going on since the Suharto-era, so what’s new? Nothing.

    The committee limits the foreign journalists to the Jakarta-based pool of reporters. It’s easier to keep an eye on them. And getting their work permit rejected is a lot more costly. Seen many foreign reports coming out of Papua lately? No. Correspondents have to beg Deplu to get admitted, then think carefully before they write.

    Again, this has been going on for years, most professional bules are aware of it, have YOU only woken up to this now? Access to Papua has been an issue for at least a decade.

    The world hasn’t really noticed this.

    Yes, they have, they just don’t care anymore because Indonesia is slowly but surely making itself irrelevant to the rest of the world.

    In general, Indonesia’s press is among the most-free in Asia.

    Yes, and amongst the most unprofessional, corruptable and generally incompetent.

    But the committee is a much cleverer way of keeping foreign journalists in line.

    It’s not clever, it’s stupid.

    What’s Djoko going to do?

    He’s a professional xenophobe, don’t give him publicity and he will naturally dissapear.

  3. avatar Robert says:

    Naga,

    Again, this has been going on for years, most professional bules are aware of it, have YOU only woken up to this now? Access to Papua has been an issue for at least a decade.

    I agree with that. The Papuan issue has been an issue since in 1963 the Indonesian army got control of West-Papua and later in 1969 the “Act of Free Choice” took place. There is no mystery about what has happened and is happening there.
    There is plenty of information, that is not the problem, there are plenty of books and reports available. The problem is what is happening with the availble information.

    You can send hundreds of journalists to West-Papua, as long as governments of other countries look away from West-Papua nothing will change and the issue will last forever.
    Most countries don’t want to address this isue for political and economical reasons. And not a single foreign government wants to jeopardize their (fragile) relationship with the Indonesian government.

    If there would be a censorship on foreign broadcasts, then the Indonesian people would have an even more limited view of things happening in Indonesia in general and West-Papua in particular.

  4. avatar 1ndra says:

    Foreign news/educational media can help bring about accountability.

    Having a wide variety of information sources available, makes it easier for people to distinguish between facts and opinions; or even truth and lies.

    Hope they didn’t make propaganda. 🙂

  5. avatar Dimp says:

    Hi Sayid,

    Banning or censoring foreign news and educational media makes it easier for the Indonesian government to lie to its people.

    Foreign news/educational media can help bring about accountability.

    I agree with you, what the government needs to do is to educate people so they can listen to the news without bias, and can actually tell the difference between rumours and facts.

    Hi 1ndra,

    Hope they didn’t make propaganda.

    Again through education, Indonesians should be able to understand what the propaganda is and can choose wisely whether the propaganda contains truth or lies.

  6. avatar Naga says:

    “Indonesians should be able to understand what the propaganda is and can choose wisely whether the propaganda contains truth or lies.”

    uhh, Indonesians need to understand the definition of propaganda first before they can move forward. Propaganda is all lies or biased information; Indonesians need to be able to distinguish between facts and fiction.

    “what the government needs to do is to educate people so they can listen to the news without bias, and can actually tell the difference between rumours and facts”

    Govt’s produce propaganda, and the Indo govt is very good at it, in fact, it’s the only thing they are consistently good at; especially in their dealings with foreign affairs.

    It is not in their interests to educate their population, they will have nobody to manipulate.

  7. avatar Dimp says:

    Hi Naga,

    Govt’s produce propaganda, and the Indo govt is very good at it, in fact, it’s the only thing they are consistently good at; especially in their dealings with foreign affairs.

    Well then it is the people like us then who need to educate others who still too naive to distinguish what is truth and what is fiction, but I think there are more and more Indonesians who are willing to learn about the truth.

    Remember how we were brainwashed year after year regarding the truth behind “Gestok”.

  8. avatar 1ndra says:

    Again through education, Indonesians should be able to understand what the propaganda is and can choose wisely whether the propaganda contains truth or lies.

    That’s not as easy as we think, our people are way to prone to something named gossip.

  9. avatar Dimp says:

    Hi 1ndra,

    That’s not as easy as we think, our people are way to prone to something named gossip.

    Anybody is prone to gossip, so the media need to be involved as well. It doesn’t help when the tv stations are competing by showing gossip shows. But again if the people are educated right then they can decide for themselves whether to watch the show or not, and when they watch they can watch it without prejudice.

  10. avatar Samantha says:

    Honestly, with the emphasis on censorship and restriction of foreign ideas, you’d think we were back in the New Order!

  11. avatar Parvita says:

    I find this news not informative. There is no reason why Mr. Susilo wants to stop foreign broadcasting. No explanation what he finds in VOA, BBC etc that is disturbing him.

    More funny that there are lots of comments and fighting on this not-so-informative posting! Get a life, guys, go cari nafkah. Patung, maybe better news to share in the future?

  12. avatar Mohammed Khafi says:

    Samantha said:

    Honestly, with the emphasis on censorship and restriction of foreign ideas, you’d think we were back in the New Order!

    Did we actually leave it? Of course we were given the chance to vote, but has anything really changed?

    Peace

  13. avatar Agungk says:

    I really don’t bother with independent/private foreign media companies beaming their contents to Indonesia. What irk me are the certain media that insert themselves into every local broadcasters as if they are something imposed onto the local media companies. Give us time slot or we will slap trade ban on you! That’s seems to be the unspoken message.
    The problem is exacerbated if the said foreign media are state sponsored.
    No matter how nice they present their contents, many viewers will always see them through tinted glasses. They will inescapably carry propaganda contents, however diluted.
    But if they beam their contents withing their own channels, none of the above should matter.

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